faqtest

  1. Offer for associations / bloggers
  2. Continuous improvement
  3. Watching the videos for free
  4. (BP16 23) Miklós Urbán & Mariann Nagy: Unique localization workshop for memoQ maniacs
  5. (BP16 22) Tiago Neto: Work those vocal cords! (Speech recognition)
  6. (BP16 21) Inga Michaeli: Diversify or specialize? A guide to becoming ‘untouchable’
  7. (BP16 20) Dorota Pawlak: Traps and pitfalls in website localisation
  8. (BP16 18) Gabi Nagy: The efficient translator – insights from an efficiency freak
  9. (BP16 16) Alison Hughes: It’s not what you spend but how you spend it
  10. (BP16 15) Christelle Maignan: Translation in transition
  11. (BP16 14) Konstantin Kisin: Translation industry talkshow
  12. (BP16 13) Tanya Quintieri: Food for thought – A translator’s life cycle
  13. (BP16 12) Steve Vitek : Introduction to modern patent translation
  14. Special discount for students and faculty members
  15. Terms (video purchases)
  16. Win a free ticket to BP19 in Bologna (or BP20 in …..)
  17. Details of each package
  18. (BP16 11) Dr Jonathan Downie: Public speaking for translators and interpreters
  19. (BP16 10) Luca Lampariello: Translation as a tool to learn any language
  20. (BP16 08/09) Sameh Ragab: An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory
  21. How much does BP19 Translation Conference cost?
  22. (BP16 07) Paula Arturo: The basics of business law and negotiation
  23. (BP16 06) Lucja Biel: The ins and out of EU translation
  24. (BP16 05) Lissa Sum: Top five reasons why Across is the perfect tool for your self-marketing
  25. (BP16 04) Valeria Aliperta: Why bad translation is like bad coffee
  26. (BP16 03) Cécilia Charlier: Make your search for EU law a success
  27. (BP16 02) Miklós Urbán: Do what you are good at – translate -, and let your tools take care of the rest
  28. (BP16 01) Gala Gil Amat: Embracing social media for your translation business
  29. (BP17 12) Dr Jonathan Downie: You need to be visible
  30. (BP17 11) Iwona Piatkowska-Biarda: Wealth dynamics for freelance professionals
  31. (BP17 10) Nicole König: Dream clients – find’em, make’em, keep’em
  32. (BP17 09) Nick Rosenthal: Customer service – is satisfaction enough?
  33. (BP17 08) Caterina Saccani: Collaborating with colleagues to get and keep your target clients
  34. (BP17 07) Michael Farrell: Translators need CVs like fish need bicycles
  35. (BP17 06) Oliver Lawrence: If you mean business, become a better writer
  36. (BP17 05) Paula Arturo: Translation Contracts: To Sign or Not to Sign
  37. (BP17 04) David Jemielity: The other side of the mirror
  38. (BP17 03) Dorota Pawlak: How blogging can help you attract more customers
  39. (BP17 02) Judy Jenner: How to convince clients you’re worth every penny
  40. (BP17 01) Henry Liu: There will not be any translators in 2025. Really?
  41. (BP18 30) Csaba Bán: Conference Wrap-up
  42. (BP18 29) Michael Farrell: Freelance translator client satisfaction surveys
  43. (BP18 28) Alison Hughes & Adriana Tortoriello: Above and Beyond: the Creative text
  44. (BP18 27) Judy Jenner: The professionalization of our profession
  45. (BP18 26) Peter Oehmen: Legal aspects in (technical) translation – Why should I care?
  46. (BP18 25) Nigel Saych: Take your work seriously but don’t be your own worst enemy
  47. (BP18 24) Nigel Wheatley: Translation with style
  48. (BP18 23) Joy Phillips: Personal challenges in a professional context
  49. (BP18 22) Dr Jonathan Downie: Pitching for people who hate sales and marketing
  50. (BP18 21) Marek Buchtel: Translator in the cloud
  51. (BP18 20) Lloyd Bingham: Dealing with Denglish & other source language interference
  52. (BP18 19) Caterina Saccani: How to gain more visibility in your target market
  53. (BP18 18) Marek Pawelec: Know your tools
  54. (BP18 17) Jo Rourke: Writing your About page
  55. (BP18 16) Alessandra Martelli: Translating your client’s personality
  56. (BP18 15) Dolores Guiñazú & Gabriella Escarrá: Master the Game: Maximise your QA
  57. (BP18 14) Andriy Yasharov: An amazingly fast and almost free way to specialize
  58. (BP18 08) Carolina Walliter: A killer CV: Let’s go visual!
  59. (BP18 04) Carlos la Orden Tovar: Why your nice profile isn’t attracting any clients
  60. (BP18 03) Jeanette Brickner: Your CPD plan for 21st century business
  61. (BP18 09) Sameh Ragab: Web scraping for translators
  62. (BP18 06) Jo Rourke: Why we’re getting value all wrong
  63. (BP18 07) Tom Imhof: Will AI, DL, and neural MT change our lives?
  64. (BP18 11) Ellen Singer: Cross-pollination
  65. (BP18 12) Dr Jonathan Downie: For business’ sake, get off your butt!
  66. (BP18 10) Gary Smith: The customer is always right. Not.
  67. (BP18 08) Carolina Walliter: A killer CV – Let’s get visual
  68. (BP18 01) João Roque Dias: What’s going on? (In our profession, that is)
  69. (BP18 05) Claudia Befu: Marketing localization: Translation, transcreation, or copywriting
  70. (BP18 02) Tatjana Radmilo: Changing the public perception of translation
  71. Walking tours
  72. Museums
  73. Exhibitions
  74. How do I change the method of payment after placing the order?
  75. How can I get the VAT amount refunded?
  76. I need help with the shopping/invoicing process
  77. Why do I have to pay VAT?
  78. Cancellation policy (+ Terms and Conditions)
  79. Is there a volume discount?
  80. Is there a discount for students and faculty members?
  81. How long are current prices valid for?
  82. What are the current prices?
  83. When does registration start?
  84. Will there be a babysitting service?
  85. What makes BP18 unique?
  86. Using public transport in Vienna
  87. How do I travel to Vienna?
  88. Where can I stay in Vienna?
  89. Will there be a day trip out of Vienna?
  90. Will there be any walking tours in Vienna?
  91. How about networking dinners?
  92. Will I get an invoice for my payment?
  93. I’m new to BP conferences, how will I find people to talk to?
  94. Can you issue an invitation letter for a Schengen visa?
  95. Who can attend BP18?
  96. Is there a discount for students and faculty?
  97. How can I register for BP18?
  98. I’m interested in the ATA exam
  99. How much does the conference cost?
  100. Do I need to pay VAT?
  101. F. A. Q. test

Offer for associations / bloggers

If you run a professional association or you write a blog, you may want to offer your membership or audience a special discount off the regular price of BP Video Library.

Please contact us for the details if you’re interested.

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Continuous improvement

We’re continuously improving the new BP Video Library.  Some of the proposed improvements in the near future:

  • More teaser videos to be added for BP18 sessions
  • Slides to be made available for select talks/sessions
  • Transcriptions to be added, especially to the videos with poor sound quality (there are 4-5 of these)
  • More cross-links to be added to recommend similar videos
  • You’ll receive all of these improvements as part of your package
  • You’ll receive a list of such improvements occasionally – once a month or so
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Watching the videos for free

Yes, free access!

We give away free access to the BP Video Library… in exchange for some volunteer work.

The sound quality is poor in some of the videos, so it would be great to have a transcript that we can share with everyone who purchased access to the videos.

How does it work?

You can earn some points that you can redeeem for free access to the BP Video Library.

Trancription of a 50-minute video with poor sound:    you get 10 points

Trancription of a 50-minute video with good sound:   you get 5 points

Trancription of a 30-minute video with good sound:   you get 3 points

1-year access to the BP Video Library (60+ videos) costs 10 points

Lifetime access to the BP Video Library (with future releases) costs 19 points

Free ticket to BP19 Translation Conference Bologna (+1 year access) costs 50 points

How to get involved?

Don’t worry, even videos with poor sound can be deciphred – you just need to turn up the volume.

If you’re interested, sign up to be a volunteer (marking ‘Video transcription’), and we’ll send you a link to one of the videos that need to be transcribed first.  Eventually all videos will have a transcript, so when you’re done with the first video, you can choose to do one or several more, even ones with good sound quality.

If you’re happy with a 1-year access to all existing videos (BP16+BP17+BP18), transcribing one video with poor sound is enough.   If you wish to have a lifetime access including all future releases, please pick more videos to transcribe, bearing in mind the ‘income’ and ‘cost’ items shown above.

We’ll send you a link to the videos to be transcribed, and you’ll send us back a Word file with the text within a reasonable timeframe (a week?).   Once you’re done, you’ll receive a unique access code to watch all titles of BP Video Library.   That’s it.

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(BP16 23) Miklós Urbán & Mariann Nagy: Unique localization workshop for memoQ maniacs

Marianna and Miklós lead the audience into a discussion between a translation professional and a technology geek language engineer, working on projects together, greatly profiting from using special productivity boosting features. They will also touch upon corpora and databases, creating special previews and other tools that provide better context to your work.

Miklós used to be the professional services manager of Kilgray, responsible for deployment, implementation and optimization of memoQ server based translation management systems.

Marianna is a senior translation and localization project manager susceptible for ever-evolving technical solutions, and she’s the operations manager for one of the top Hungarian translation agencies.

Miklós used to be the professional services manager of Kilgray, responsible for deployment, implementation and optimization of memoQ server based translation management systems. He is essentially a technical person, but gained experience in localization working through all stages in the localization process including translation, language engineering and managing production teams. Managed the production teams of two of the largest language service providers in Hungary. He always aimed at streamlining localization processes, automating workflows, increasing localization quality, and reducing costs. He holds substantial experience in designing, developing and implementing integration between systems used in translation management. He regularly leads trainings for translation management teams and courses at universities. His core specialities are project management and memoQ based workflows. He is a hobby sky-watcher.

Marianna is a senior translation and localization project manager susceptible for ever-evolving technical solutions, and she’s the operations manager for one of the top Hungarian translation agencies. Her specialty is managing large scale translation projects, employing PMI based project management methods. Having a degree and numerous years of experience in translation for world leading client EU, she always strives to run translation projects with the translator’s convenience and interest in focus. Training and mentoring junior project managers is an essential part of her job. She loves to explain the best practices of our industry to newbies and to think out of the box and find state of the art solutions together with experienced colleagues.

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(BP16 22) Tiago Neto: Work those vocal cords! (Speech recognition)

Speech recognition has been with us for some time now, with multiple software solutions for just about every platform and budget.
This session provides a very pragmatic approach on how to use this for a translator’s everyday work, focusing on improved ergonomics and workflow.

A veterinarian by training, Tiago has practised Veterinary Medicine since 2005, following periods of studying and training in Portugal, the USA and Switzerland. He has worked as an official veterinarian from 2005 until the end of 2014.

A veterinarian by training, Tiago has practised Veterinary Medicine since 2005, following periods of studying and training in Portugal, the USA and Switzerland. He has worked as an official veterinarian from 2005 until the end of 2014.

He developed his business as a EN & ES >PT translator over the last five years, working almost exclusively in the veterinary medicine, medicine and pharmaceutical fields of knowledge.

Currently working as a freelance translator, he is now pursuing a PhD in Biomedical Sciences, focusing on new therapeutic approaches for several cancers using animal models, namely cervical cancer secondary to HPV infection.

A complete nut for motorcycles of almost any kind, he is also known for blatantly advertising Portuguese tourism and culinary traditions and occasionally making loud noises if allowed to grasp any kind of guitar.

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(BP16 21) Inga Michaeli: Diversify or specialize? A guide to becoming ‘untouchable’

A busy translator discovers one day her desk is almost empty. So what now? Despair or diversify? What are the roads to diversification? Is specialization better, or is there a golden mean between the two? And what do Ken Robinson and Tom Friedman have to do with it? A 3-act story with a happy ending.

Inga Michaeli discussed two possible strategies to cope with low workloads. Diversify or specialize? Or both? At BP16 Translation Conference she argued that you need to achieve an ‘untouchable’ status – so that you cannot be replaced by other translators.

Some of the key areas

  • Horizontal vs vertical diversification
  • Becoming ‘untouchable’
  • Four strategies to securing your status as a preferred translator
  • Practical hints and personal stories

Based in Israel, Inga Michaeli has translated over 220 titles – fiction, non-fiction and lots of DK and LP travel guides – as well as many hours of movies and TV shows, academic articles and marketing texts in need of some oomph. She is a former Chair of the Israel Translators Association (2008-2010), …

Based in Israel, Inga Michaeli has translated over 220 titles – fiction, non-fiction and lots of DK and LP travel guides – as well as many hours of movies and TV shows,  academic articles and marketing texts in need of some oomph. She is a former Chair of the Israel Translators Association (2008-2010), has taught subtitling, literary translation and creative non-fiction translation at Beit Berl College and is a regular speaker at conferences in Israel and abroad.    Her main field of expertise (and true passion) is tourism and travel – she translates (English<>Hebrew) for major airlines, hotel chains, booking sites and other outfits, and is regularly featured in Hebrew travel magazines (Masa Acher) and newspapers (Globes), as well as English-language travel mags (Holyland and Discover Israel). She is member of the Israel Association of Periodical Press (IAPP), a member of Persona and owner of Wander Words.

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(BP16 20) Dorota Pawlak: Traps and pitfalls in website localisation

You don’t need special powers or magical rings to translate and localise websites. There are other ways to remain invisible and exceptional. This session focuses on challenges in website localisation from a translator’s perspective. Dorota will also explain how to find the way out of the localisation maze.

Dorota Pawlak is an English and German into Polish translator specialised in IT and localisation. She runs online courses and face-to-face workshops on website localisation and enjoys writing for her blog Beyond the Words. Dorota holds an MA in Translation and an MSc in Multilingual Computing and Localisation. You can find out more about Dorota via her website.

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(BP16 18) Gabi Nagy: The efficient translator – insights from an efficiency freak

Do you ever waste time or struggle to focus? Are you ready to learn from your colleagues? Do you want to improve as a person and as a professional? Prepare for an interactive session and bring your very best to enrich others.

Gabi Nagy talked about efficiency hacks and productivity tools in her presentation at BP16 Translation Conference.

Some of the key areas

  • Everyday efficiency hacks
  • Building on your own strength, improving on your weaknesses
  • Organizing your time and desk
  • Ergonomy at a translator’s workspace
  • GTD – the ‘Getting Things Done’ method
  • Setting up daily/weekly/monthly plans
  • The ‘Year Compass’ tool
  • How to be a more efficient translator

This Hungarian lady loves being able to create a bridge between cultures, languages and people with her HU-EN-IT language pairs. It is not by accident that she named her brand – Chain Bridge Translations – after one of the main landmarks of her beloved home town.

This Hungarian lady loves being able to create a bridge between cultures, languages and people with her HU-EN-IT language pairs. It is not by accident that she named her brand – Chain Bridge Translations – after one of the main landmarks of her beloved home town.
She holds a BA in Economics, has a degree in financial and social science translations as well as a European Masters in Conference Interpreting.
She regularly interprets at diplomatic and EU-related events, conferences and press conferences, and was recently invited to the top Hungarian professional conference to lead a roundtable discussion on interpreting and be a panelist as the voice of a new generation of freelance professionals.
Besides professional excellence she enjoys riding her pink city bike, a glass of red wine in the evening and creating value through volunteering activities.

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(BP16 16) Alison Hughes: It’s not what you spend but how you spend it

What do you spend your marketing/CPD budget on? And what do you do when the budget runs out? Alison looks briefly at her non-negotiable expenses before sharing a few ways she increased her confidence, learnt about her specialism and marketed her services for free (or nearly free).

The 21st century witnessed the rise of the digital business. And while marketing used to be ridiculed and vilified by popular 80’s writers, such as Douglas Adams, in today’s online global market everyone agrees that 50% of a business’ success is a good product, and the other 50% a good marketing strategy.

Marketing localization is a crucial service for any business that wants to reach a global audience. But how can a professional working in the language services industry come up with the right localization strategy for each and every client?

The first step is a good definition of marketing localization as a service. Is all marketing localization transcreation? What exactly is transcreation and how does it differ from translation or copywriting? If you localize content are you still a translator or are you a localizer? And why do we need localization after all?

If you ever had to answer one or several of the above questions and you didn’t know where to start, join this session. We will have a look at different localization techniques and current marketing content trends.

Alison Hughes is a French-to-English translator and copywriter for the creative industries. She has been a qualified member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting since 2001 and is the coordinator of its Media, Arts & Tourism network.

Alison Hughes is a French-to-English translator and copywriter for the creative industries. She has been a qualified member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting since 2001 and is the coordinator of its Media, Arts & Tourism network.

Back in 1981, with an MA in French, German and Economics from Glasgow University under her belt, she set off for a job in the export department of Mumm Champagne in Reims. Three years later, with her language skills honed, her typing skills improved and her champagne appreciation skills second-to-none, she moved to VAT 69 Whisky in Central London.

Then in 1987, following the Guinness takeover of the small distillers, Alison found herself in a newly-formed translation team at the company’s London headquarters. She then replaced the translator in the Glasgow office before embarking on a freelance career in 1997.

Alison presented for the first time at the 2015 ITI Conference and is now on a quest to help translators step out from behind their computer screens and embrace the wider business world… one step at a time.

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(BP16 15) Christelle Maignan: Translation in transition

The only constant is change, especially in business, where the speed of change is rapidly increasing. Technological advances have led to new trends, new products, and new market players in the translation industry. To survive in this new reality, translators need new skills: change management skills.

Christelle Maignan is a translator-turned-coach who spoke, well, about coaching for translators at BP16 Translation Conference in Prague.  A good coach asks questions, just as Christelle did. Can you recognize the factors that change your career?   Are you ready to accept or even capitalize on these changes?

Some of key areas of this session include:

  • Translation in transition: a changing professional landscape
  • Personal development
  • Translators’ Change Management Wheel
  • Machine translation coming soon
  • Dealing with threats and opportunities
  • Complacency: the false sense of security

Christelle Maignan (@Coach4Tran)  has been freelancing as an English-to-French translator since 2004. She is a member of the Institute of Translation & Interpreting (ITI) and of the International Coach Federation (ICF). As a trained and qualified coach, Christelle founded  Coaching For Translators, ….

Christelle Maignan (@Coach4Tran)  has been freelancing as an English-to-French translator since 2004. She is a member of the Institute of Translation & Interpreting (ITI) and of the International Coach Federation (ICF). As a trained and qualified coach, Christelle founded  Coaching For Translators to help translators and interpreters reach their goals faster and more efficiently. She specialises in the human side of change and believes that we can adapt successfully to the latest technologies through a better understanding of the change process itself and of the various options available. To help with this, she developed the Future-Proof Translator webinar series,  which she is offering in partnership with  eCPD Webinars.

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(BP16 14) Konstantin Kisin: Translation industry talkshow

Kicking off the day with a unique talkshow, featuring some of the conference speakers, hosted by Konstantin Kisin, famous for his sharp witticism. The panel will discuss translation-related issues you’ve always wanted to ask – but perhaps you never dared.

Featuring Chris Durban, Steve Vitek, Gabi Nagy, Erik Hansson, Christelle Maignan, and Paula Arturo.

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(BP16 13) Tanya Quintieri: Food for thought – A translator’s life cycle

Six phases in a translator’s perfect life cycle: birth, childhood, education, work, giving back, and retirement. Breaks in a perfect cycle can take their toll and throw us off. While thoughts about ‘what-ifs’ can keep us from leading a fulfilled life, a Plan B can be useful. Tanya would like to offer some food for thought.

Tanya Quintieri moved to Europe in 1993. She’s a US American with German, Puerto Rican and Lithuanian roots and started freelancing as a translator in 2003. Over the years, she specialized in marketing. Today, she serves her clients as a global corporate communications consultant.

Tanya Quintieri moved to Europe in 1993. She’s a US American with German, Puerto Rican and Lithuanian roots and started freelancing as a translator in 2003. Over the years, she specialized in marketing. Today, she serves her clients as a global corporate communications consultant. Together with her team of freelancers she offers a complete portfolio that ranges from translation, multilingual copywriting and web design to graphic design services. She loves to be part of her clients’ teams for single projects or even for longer periods, all while enjoying the freedom that freelancing has to offer. Of course she still translates herself, mainly for selected long-term clients.

Being a committed entrepreneur, Tanya loves to share her knowledge and experience gained in more than 12 years of successful freelancing. One of many reasons why she heads an association for translators and interpreters. She has also been invited to speak at conferences, fairs and universities throughout Germany and Europe. Her topics include young professionals, social media marketing, corporate identity, cooperation opportunities for freelancers as well as customer acquisition and—much more important!—customer retention. She hosts a number of groups on Facebook, including tTime (for WordPress users) and Mac for Translators.

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(BP16 12) Steve Vitek : Introduction to modern patent translation

Steve Vlasta Vitek BP16 patent translation

Similar topics

Introduction to patent translation for language, history, and philosophy majors and other corporate culture rejects. If you start with translation of easy patents, eventually you may come to like patents and other types of technical translation.

In this presentation at BP16 Translation Conference, Steve Vitek gave the audience a crash course on patent translation. He explains how translating patents is a unique niche in the translation business. Rest assured, patent translators will have enough work as long as technical innovations appear, i.e. until ‘we destroy this planet’. Steve also writes a popular blog and is about to publish a book, ‘The Diary of a Mad Patent Translator’.

Key areas of this session include

  • Why patent translation is a lucrative niche
  • Starting out as a patent translator
  • Requirements for patent translators
  • Unique language and structure of patents

Steve Vlasta Vitek received his master’s degree in Japanese and English studies from Charles University in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1980. He worked as an in-house translator for the Czechoslovak News Agency (ČTK) in Prague (1980-81), and for Japan Import Center in Tokyo, Japan (1985-86).

Steve Vlasta Vitek received his master’s degree in Japanese and English studies from Charles University in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1980. He worked as an in-house translator for the Czechoslovak News Agency (ČTK) in Prague (1980-81), and for Japan Import Center in Tokyo, Japan (1985-86). He has been in independent practice working mostly for patent law firms as a translator specializing in translation of Japanese, German and French patents and articles from technical journals, as well as in translation of patents and other documents from Czech, Slovak, Russian and Polish in United States since 1987.

Before moving to Eastern Virginia in 2001 where he lives now, he spent almost two decades in San Francisco and the Bay Area. He has been writing articles about translation for publications for translators in United States on paper and online for more than two decades, including the ATA Chronicle, NCTA’s Translorial, NCATA’s Capital Translator, The Gotham Translator of the New York Circle of Translators, etc. His website is at PatentTranslators.com, and he also writes a blog, aptly titled as a Diary of a Mad Patent Translator.

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Special discount for students and faculty members

If you are a full-time student of translation or interpreting studies or a related field during the current academic year, or you are a professor/teacher at such a course, you ere eligible for a 60% discount on the ‘BP Video Library’ item. This means that instead of the regular price of 75€ (+VAT), you can purchase this item for 30€ (+VAT), and you’ll be able to watch videos from the past 3 BP Translation Conferences for a period of one year.

The discount is not valid for ‘BP18’ videos, nor the ‘BP Video Library unlimited’ item.

Please send us a proof of your student or faculty status together with a copy of your ID card to receive the discount code.  Allow 1-2 days for the response.  Once you receive the discount code, you must use the same email address during the purchasing process.

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Terms (video purchases)

Packages

Currently we have three packages available, each with different scope and duration.  The ‘BP18’ package allows you to watch all sessions recorded at BP18 Translation Conference, any number of times, for a period of one year after purchase.  The ‘All’ (or ‘BP Video Library’) package allows you to watch all sessions recorded at BP16, BP17, and BP18 conferences, any number of times, for a period of one year after purchase.  Finally, the ‘BP Video Library unlimited’ package allows you to watch all existing videos, plus all future videos, for an unlimited time.

Purchase

You can purchase access to the videos at our online store on this website, under the Registration tab.  After selecting the desired item, open your shopping cart, then proceed to the checkout process.  On the next page you can provide your billing details.  If you select ‘Business’, and you’re from the European Union, provide a valid VAT number to avoid paying VAT. If you’re outside the EU, it’s up to you if you select ‘business’ or ‘individual’ — but you’re advised to follow any regulations  valid in your home country. If you’re based in Hungary, VAT will be added in both cases (you can claim a refund later if you purchase as a business).

Payment + Invoicing

Due to taxation regulations in force in Hungary, you will receive up to three different types of documents with your purchase.

If you pay with your bank card or from your PayPal account, you will automatically receive an ‘order receipt‘: this is basically an email to acknowledge your order.  A ‘deposit invoice‘ will be sent manually from our invoicing system; allow up to 12 hours for this.  At a later point you will receive a final invoice. This final invoice will list all the purchased items with a positive sign, the amount already paid with a negative sign, as well as the final payable balance (i.e. zero).

If you pay via bank transfer or TransferWise, first you automatically receive an ‘order receipt‘: this is basically an email to acknowledge your order. A ‘pro forma invoice‘ will be sent automatically from our invoicing system at the time of placing the order. This pro forma invoice lists all the items purchased and indicates the bank account details where you send the purchase amount. For Transferwise payments, make sure the target currency is set to HUF — all other details you need to provide are listed in the pro forma invoice and the automated emails.

The funds are supposed to arrive within 3 days.  If the funds are not received within 5 days, your order will be cancelled.  Once the funds are credited on our bank account, you’ll receive a ‘deposit invoice‘ – this has to be processed manually. From this point on the process is identical with the one for bank cards / PayPal as described above.

Watching the videos

As soon as your funds are cleared on our bank account, you will receive an email that includes a unique URL.  This URL (link) is your key to access the videos.   The videos are stored  on Vimeo, a premium video sharing platform. If you’re new to this, you’ll have to create a profile (very simple, only your name and email are needed).   After this you simply hit Continue then Watch now — and you can watch the videos.

Whenever you log on to Vimeo again, your videos will be there for the duration selected (one year or unlimited, depending on the package you purchased).  You can access Vimeo and watch your videos from any device — PC, tablet, mobile.

The URL is unique and can be redeemed only once. But once you redeem it, you can watch the videos any number of times for the duration of your purchase.

No refund policy

Since your purchase is complete once your receive the unique URL, we cannot give you any refund for video purchases.  Thank you for your understanding.

Also, if you choose to pay by bank transfer or Transferwise, and your payment is not received within 5 days, your order will be cancelled.

Your email

We reserve the right to send you promotional emails about BP events from time to time (not too often; about once a month from December to April, then maybe once during the rest of the year).  We will never share, sell, or give away your email to any third party.  You’ll be able to unsubscribe from these emails any time.

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Win a free ticket to BP19 in Bologna (or BP20 in …..)

This is your chance to win a free ticket

If watching BP conference videos whets your appetite for the real thing, here’s the good news: with your purchase, you’ll get a chance to win a free ticket to our next event, BP19 Translation Conference in Bologna.

How does it work?

Each purchase is entered into a draw (except for purchases of single videos) with different weight, depending on which package you buy.  With the purchase of the BP18 package you’ll get a single chance, with the purchase of all videos you’ll get 2 chances, and with the purchase of all existing and future videos you’ll get 3 chances.

After each batch of 200 purchase units we’ll draw a lucky winner using Randompicker.com.  For example 40 people bought the ‘BP18’ package, 50 people bought the ‘ALL’ package, while 20 people bought the full video library access.  This means the winner will be picked at this point, since 1×40 + 2×50 + 3×20 = 200.

Terms

We’ll notify the winner by email, and publish the protocol of the random draw.  The prize cannot be transferred to another person, and no cash equivalent will be paid. The winner receives a free ticket to BP19 or BP20 Translation Conference. (Conference only; the free ticket does not include networking dinners.)

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Details of each package

FULL VIDEO LIBRARY

With your purchase you’ll receive access to all existing videos (recorded at BP16, BP17, BP18 Translation Conferences), plus all videos from all future BP events, for an unlimited period of time.  You’ll be able stream the videos any number of times.  You’ll also get a triple chance to win a free ticket to BP19 or BP20.  Purchase this item in our online store.

ALL

With your purchase you’ll receive access to all existing videos (recorded at BP16, BP17, BP18 Translation Conferences), for a period of 1 year.  You’ll be able stream the videos any number of times.  You’ll also get a double chance to win a free ticket to BP19 or BP20.  Purchase this item in our online store.

BP18

With your purchase you’ll receive access to all videos recorded BP18 Translation Conference, for a period of 1 year.  You’ll be able stream the videos any number of times.  You’ll also get a chance to win a free ticket to BP19 or BP20.  Purchase this item in our online store.

ANY 1

You can watch any individual item from the BP Video Library for a period of 24 hours.  To buy a single video, please open our Vimeo page, select the item, and pay there.

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(BP16 11) Dr Jonathan Downie: Public speaking for translators and interpreters

In what was probably the liveliest session at BP16 Translation Conference, Jonathan Downie taught us that public speaking for translators is nothing to be scared of. By shaking up our fears and muscles, he gave us an inspiring presentation full of practical hints.

In what was probably the liveliest session at BP16 Translation Conference, Jonathan Downie taught us that public speaking for translators is nothing to be scared of.  By shaking up our fears and muscles, he gave us an inspiring presentation full of practical hints.

Some of the key areas

  • The purpose of public speaking
  • Creating memories in the audience
  • Maintaining the audience’s attention level
  • How to talk to clients in person
  • The art of being silent
  • Unleash the power within you

Jonathan Downie is a conference interpreter, researcher, writer and speaker based in Edinburgh, Scotland. He interprets in both directions between French and English and translates from French to English, specialising in press- and public-facing events and texts.

Jonathan Downie is a conference interpreter, researcher, writer and speaker based in Edinburgh, Scotland. He interprets in both directions between French and English and translates from French to English, specialising in press- and public-facing events and texts.   His recently completed PhD at Heriot-Watt University,  aimed to increase understanding of stakeholder expectations of interpreters. He regularly writes pieces on the link between research and practice in translation and interpreting for  professional magazines such as the ITI Bulletin and the VKD Kurier.  His first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence, looks at how interpreters can add value to their clients and profession   and was published by Routledge in May 2016.

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(BP16 10) Luca Lampariello: Translation as a tool to learn any language

Luca Lampariello BP16 card FB

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Translation can be used as a powerful instrument to start learning any language on your own.

How to get started learning a new language / How to choose the right material to work on / How to work on the material by using bilingual translation / How to plan your time effectively

Luca Lampariello has been studying foreign languages for over 20 years. He holds a degree in Electronic Engineering from La Sapienza University of Rome and attended the Higher Institute of Interpretation and Translation in Paris. He is fluent in ten languages and has coached hundreds of students using an original system of study to develop native-like pronunciation and syntactic capacity. Since 2008, his videos on YouTube and blog, The Polyglot Dream, have attracted thousands of followers and language learners all around the world.

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(BP16 08/09) Sameh Ragab: An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory

Every now and then translators get one of those projects that poses a wide spectrum of challenges to its success. Join Sameh Ragab on a storytelling journey describing custom verification rules, automating consistency checks, and brand new CAT tool and ad-hoc tool tips that make our lives easier.

Sameh Ragab is an ISO 17100 Lead Auditor and Certified Translation Provider, CAT Tools and Terminology Management Expert, UN and World Bank Registered Translation Vendor, DTP specialist, and Certified Localizer.  ….

Sameh Ragab is an ISO 17100 Lead Auditor and Certified Translation Provider, CAT Tools and Terminology Management Expert, UN and World Bank Registered Translation Vendor, DTP specialist, and Certified Localizer. A renowned international speaker and trainer focusing on the technical side of translation, Sam has over 26 years of expertise in the translation and localization industry and sets the benchmarks for quality work, with a focus on Arabic and Middle Eastern translation, localization and DTP services. Moreover, Sam has an outstanding history in training translators and localizers to excel using latest Cat and Terminology Management tools. Sam has given workshops and conference talks in 14 countries and his hobbies include fishing, angling, snorkeling, scuba diving and swimming.

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How much does BP19 Translation Conference cost?

The entrance fee for the conference and the fringe events depends on a host of factors.

The price will be announced probably early to mid-December.

As an indication, the Early Bird price for our last event (BP18) was 260€, valid for the first 100 tickets sold.  (Mind you, the first 100 tickets were sold within 24 hours, so it’s a good to sign up for the early bird announcement.)

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(BP16 07) Paula Arturo: The basics of business law and negotiation

In this presentation we will explore some of the basics of international business law and negotiation to help freelance translators overcome asymmetry of information and gain more negotiating power when entering into binding agreements.

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(BP16 06) Lucja Biel: The ins and out of EU translation

This session explores the challenges and quality issues in EU legal translation, which is subject to a complex array of political, procedural, and institutional factors. EU translation differs in many ways from typical legal translation and requires a confident use of tools and resources.

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(BP16 05) Lissa Sum: Top five reasons why Across is the perfect tool for your self-marketing

Can a CAT tool assist you in your self-marketing efforts? Across can do exactly that – and so much more! Discover the top five reasons why working with Across is perfect for you.
(sponsored session)

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(BP16 04) Valeria Aliperta: Why bad translation is like bad coffee

The Romans used to say ‘scripta manent’ – when content is well written, persuasive, and on-target, it also sells more. That’s why brands that care for their communication hire copywriters and transcreators. Because after all, bad translation is like bad coffee: life is too short for both.

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(BP16 03) Cécilia Charlier: Make your search for EU law a success

Cécilia Charlier BP16

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EUR-LEX provides free access to European Union law in the 24 official EU languages. Learn how you can find information in EUR-Lex, use the multilingual display to compare documents in up to three languages simultaneously, and benefit from being a registered user to save preferences, items, and searches.

Cécilia Charlier is a Webmaster-editor in the EUR-Lex editorial team of the Publications Office of the European Union. She has been working for the past 14 years in the European institutions. She acquired a broad range of experience in the European Commission, the European Parliament and the European Investment Bank.

Cécilia Charlier is a Webmaster-editor in the EUR-Lex editorial team of the Publications Office of the European Union. She has been working for the past 14 years in the European institutions. She acquired a broad range of experience in the European Commission, the European Parliament and the European Investment Bank.

From 2006 to 2009 she worked in the European Parliament Office in Scotland as a Communication officer where she organised conferences and outreach events and designed teaching and information resources.

Since February 2015, Cécilia has joined the EUR-Lex editorial team where she has been giving several presentations on EUR-Lex, the online portal giving free access to European Union law in the 24 official EU languages.

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(BP16 02) Miklós Urbán: Do what you are good at – translate -, and let your tools take care of the rest

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It’s no longer enough to be a good translator. If you’re a freelance language professional, you have to manage your own projects and business as well: keep in touch with your clients, create quotes, track your various jobs, deadlines and payments, archive project, and many other tasks. You can all of these in a single tool: Language Terminal.

(sponsored session)

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(BP16 01) Gala Gil Amat: Embracing social media for your translation business

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Social media can help you grow your business, but do you know how to use social media effectively? The potential to reach new customers through social media is constantly growing and we cannot miss this opportunity. In this session Gala talks about how to use each social media effectively.

Social media can help you grow your business, but do you know how to use social media effectively? The potential to reach new customers through social media is constantly growing and we cannot miss this opportunity. In this session Gala talks about how to use each social media effectively.

Some of key areas of this session include:

  • Effective way of marketing your business
  • Setting up Facebook pages to reach more clients
  • Facebook ad targeting
  • Facebook Instant Articles
  • Creating vs curating content
  • Using Twitter to tell about your most recent blog posts
  • Raising your SEO ranking using social media
  • Using Snapchat to reach a younger audience

Gala Gil Amat is a translator working from English, French, Catalan and Polish into Spanish. She combines freelancing with the studies in Translation and Interpreting in the University of Alicante (Spain) and the University of Warsaw (Poland).

Gala Gil Amat is a translator working from English, French, Catalan and Polish into Spanish. She combines freelancing with the studies in Translation and Interpreting in the University of Alicante (Spain) and the University of Warsaw (Poland).

Her passion for social media made her specialized in this field. Nowadays, she works for several international companies as a Digital Marketing and Social Media Marketing Consultant. Gala is a Google Analytics, HubSpot Inbound Marketing and Hootsuite Certified Professional.

She also runs her own blog, Transgalator, where she shares tips on social media for translators and interpreters.

Finally, she is a social media trainer for some translation-related companies like Proz.com or Alexandria Project.

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(BP17 12) Dr Jonathan Downie: You need to be visible

Translators and interpreters are often taught to be so good, it’s as if they weren’t even there. We have been taught that the essence of good translation and interpreting is that it can be mistaken for something originally created in the target language.

Translators and interpreters are often taught to be so good, it’s as if they weren’t even there. We have been taught that the essence of good translation and interpreting is that it can be mistaken for something originally created in the target language.

While this is often useful ideal, it has led many translators and interpreters to view their work simply as a linguistic act – forgetting the real social and commercial impact that it has. This in turn, has led to increasing price pressure and a reduction in the status of our profession. When clients understand and appreciate our impact, however, they are much more likely to want to pay the prices we ask.

This session will confront the results of the invisibility myth and give examples of how and why we can become more visible, both in our marketing and PR, and in the way we deliver our work.

Dr Jonathan Downie is a conference interpreter (French to English, English to French), author, research and speaker on interpreting. A regular at conferences and events in the interpreting and events industries, he has written on the power and potential of interpreting ….

Dr Jonathan Downie is a conference interpreter (French to English, English to French), author, research and speaker on interpreting. A regular at conferences and events in the interpreting and events industries, he has written on the power and potential of interpreting for client magazines and Flight Time, the in-flight magazine of Flybe. His first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence, was published by Routledge in 2016.

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(BP17 11) Iwona Piatkowska-Biarda: Wealth dynamics for freelance professionals

BP17 Translation Conference Iwona Piatkowska Biarda wealth dynamics session card

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“Everyone is born a genius, but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” Each of us has our own flow and energy that naturally links our dreams to our reality.

“Everyone is born a genius, but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” Each of us has our own flow and energy that naturally links our dreams to our reality. Everyone has a dynamic entrepreneurial profile and a natural path to success. We are all genius-born wealth creators, but our energy differs.

Are you great at getting things started, but terrible at finishing? Do you get frustrated when others can’t do what you can do? Are you in the zone when actively leading others? Are you often caught up in detail? Procrastination sounds similar? Are you quiet by nature and only share if asked? Do you love making considered decisions? Are you a perfectionist? Have you ever considered what actually creates your flow? Are you interested to know how to determine your entrepreneurial profile? Do you want to find the ways to achieve your financial freedom wisely and in line with your inner skills and characteristics of your personality?

If so, this session is for you! During the session I will show you how wealth dynamics helped me to develop my business pathway where translation as a profession is just one of its pillars.

Iwona Piątkowska-Biarda is a freelance translator, traveller and rentalpreneur. Author of Master Your Time book with secrets of achieving a work-life balance for freelancers. Fascinated by idea of going confidently in the direction of one’s dreams and living the life you have truly imagined.

Iwona Piątkowska-Biarda is a freelance translator, traveller and rentalpreneur. Author of Master Your Time book with secrets of achieving a work-life balance for freelancers. Fascinated by idea of going confidently in the direction of one’s dreams and living the life you have truly imagined. Sets herself big, exciting goals and makes them happen. Her book is a holistic approach for freelance professionals who want to improve their work-life balance and prosper in all areas.

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(BP17 10) Nicole König: Dream clients – find’em, make’em, keep’em

BP17 Translation Conference Nicole König dream clients session card

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Finding clients is just the first step on the road to a blissful existence as a language entrepreneur. There are many courses on how to find good clients. The (translation) world is full of clients! But how do I reach those who are my best fit?

Finding clients is just the first step on the road to a blissful existence as a language entrepreneur. There are many courses on how to find good clients. The (translation) world is full of clients! But how do I reach those who are my best fit? How do I make them appreciate my services and how do I make them come back again and again? I want to work with participants on how to turn good clients into dream clients: loyal, generous and vocal (when it comes to referring you). We’ll touch on topics like communication, templates, project management, going that extra mile, post-project experience, what to do and what never to do, how to ask for testimonials, and how to keep yourself front-of-mind.

Nicole König about herself:  As The Vegan Translator and a professional wordsmith, I provide copywriting, transcreation and translation. In a former life, I left my mark in import-export trading, experiencing first hand the rush and the rat-race side of things.

Nicole König about herself:  As The Vegan Translator and a professional wordsmith, I provide copywriting, transcreation and translation. In a former life, I left my mark in import-export trading, experiencing first hand the rush and the rat-race side of things. Today, I enjoy the free in freelancing all the more. My dream clients are entrepreneurs, and my dream projects touch on aviation, branding and company profiling.

What I love about our profession: daily opportunity to catalyst clients’ success, while at the same time promoting our own brand and standing. What I love about my peers: the natural order of old bees fostering newer bees, who in turn add fresh ideas, tools, and knowledge to the equation. I’m big on karma and giving back, or rather, giving forward. With Avocadette, I have established an online magazine for linguists, currently sporting writings in seven languages. Since late/end of October 2016, I head the DVÜD as their president, an incredible honor and one more opportunity to give back to the community.

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(BP17 09) Nick Rosenthal: Customer service – is satisfaction enough?

BP17 Translation Conference Nick Rosenthal customer satisfaction session card

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In this session, we will look at good and bad examples of customer service. By looking at customer service in other sectors, we can gain insights that help us in running our own businesses. What do customers actually look for in business relationships?

Nick Rosenthal is a qualified translator (MITI), and a past Chair of ITI‘s Board. He is MD of SalfTrans, a specialist translation company based in Greater Manchester. Nick has also been involved in professional development for translators since the 1980s, and he has a passion for excellence, for customer service, and for excellent customer service!

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(BP17 08) Caterina Saccani: Collaborating with colleagues to get and keep your target clients

BP17 Translation Conference Budapest Caterina Saccani collaborating with colleagues

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Who says you can only be successful at marketing your translation and interpreting services if you are an extrovert? Everyone can leverage their strengths, qualifications and passions to position themselves as the go-to resource in a given target market.

Who says you can only be successful at marketing your translation and interpreting services if you are an extrovert? Everyone can leverage their strengths, qualifications and passions to position themselves as the go-to resource in a given target market. During this session we will discuss several marketing and PR strategies that have turned out to bring success to freelance translators in terms of achieving greater visibility, and can be applied according to the translator’s personality.

You will learn how to expand your comfort zone, think out of the box and break new grounds, but also how to maximize your talents if you are not the most outgoing person on earth. After this session, you might decide it’s about time to break your terror barrier and give a talk at a conference in your target group or leverage your excellent writing skills and submit an article to one of the magazines most read by your target groups.

Caterina Saccani is a freelance Italian conference interpreter and translator specializing in legal texts and marketing copy for the green industry. She was born and raised in Northern Italy and she’s now based in Aachen (Germany) and Genk (Belgium), but she tends to consider herself a world citizen.

Caterina Saccani is a freelance Italian conference interpreter and translator specializing in legal texts and marketing copy for the green industry. She was born and raised in Northern Italy and she’s now based in Aachen (Germany) and Genk (Belgium), but she tends to consider herself a world citizen. Her working languages are Italian, German, English and Dutch. One of her missions is to help raise awareness about our profession through professional associations and other networks. Caterina is also a serial networker who loves bringing people together.

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(BP17 07) Michael Farrell: Translators need CVs like fish need bicycles

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Hordes of budding young translators arrive fresh on the market each year and inundate potential clients with their carefully written curricula vitae, often in that newfangled Europass format. Even some established professionals regularly do mail shots with their painstakingly designed CVs, …

Hordes of budding young translators arrive fresh on the market each year and inundate potential clients with their carefully written curricula vitae, often in that newfangled Europass format. Even some established professionals regularly do mail shots with their painstakingly designed CVs, perhaps after attending costly workshops on how to write a killer curriculum vitae. But is this the right way to land freelance projects?
The speaker will attempt to persuade attendees not only that CVs are totally the wrong tool for the job, but are actually harmful.
Freelancers are – in reality – one-person language service providers and, as such, they should sell themselves, sing their own praises and promote their businesses. They should therefore be using marketing materials to advertise their services.

Michael Farrell is primarily a freelance translator and transcreator. Over the years, he has acquired experience in the cultural tourism field and in transcreating advertising copy and press releases, chiefly for the promotion of technology products. Being a keen amateur cook, he also translates texts on Italian cuisine.

Michael Farrell is primarily a freelance translator and transcreator. Over the years, he has acquired experience in the cultural tourism field and in transcreating advertising copy and press releases, chiefly for the promotion of technology products. Being a keen amateur cook, he also translates texts on Italian cuisine. Besides this, he is an untenured lecturer in computer tools for translation and interpreting at the IULM University (Milan, Italy), the developer of the terminology search tool IntelliWebSearch, a qualified member of the Italian Association of Translators and Interpreters (AITI) and member of MET (Mediterranean Editors & Translators).

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(BP17 06) Oliver Lawrence: If you mean business, become a better writer

BP17 Translation Conference Oliver Lawrence become a better writer session card

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Translators are writers, they say. We ought to be, but are we really? The way we write is the first thing prospective clients notice about us, from our websites and profiles to how we pen an email. Written mastery of our target language is a huge sales weapon, a vital way to add value for our clients, …

Translators are writers, they say. We ought to be, but are we really? The way we write is the first thing prospective clients notice about us, from our websites and profiles to how we pen an email. Written mastery of our target language is a huge sales weapon, a vital way to add value for our clients, and a serious tactic for prolonging our careers (to keep the machines at bay). But how many of us can say that our writing is all it ought to be? Is your prose polished or pedestrian? Is your copy crisp or just cr*p? Our translations should – of course – be accurate, complete and correct, with all the commas in the right places.

But we can do better. We can strive for a pithy phrase rather than settling for the mediocrity of cliché. We can find the words that inform, persuade, impress and even entertain. And we can craft beautiful, effective texts that give our clients and their readers what they need. Honing our writing is a way we can all raise the bar in our profession. You up for it?

Oliver Lawrence is a Chartered Linguist, MCIL and MITI who has been purveying Italian-to-English translations since 2008, latterly under the name Incisive English. He specialises in translating and transcreating tourism texts and marketing copy – and even writing it, on a good day – from his base in Norma, not far from Rome.

Oliver Lawrence is a Chartered Linguist, MCIL and MITI who has been purveying Italian-to-English translations since 2008, latterly under the name Incisive English. He specialises in translating and transcreating tourism texts and marketing copy – and even writing it, on a good day – from his base in Norma, not far from Rome. He delights in reading crisp, elegant and (of course) incisive English and strives to produce just that for his clients and their readers. He has given webinars and presentations on tourism translation, creative translation, ambiguity and clear writing, including an online course with eCPD Webinars.

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(BP17 05) Paula Arturo: Translation Contracts: To Sign or Not to Sign

BP17 Translation Conference Paula Arturo translation contracts session card

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Whether dealing with agencies or direct clients, translators are often overwhelmed and confused about what’s legal and what’s not in “standard” contracts. Should we sign non-disclosure agreements? If so, when and under what circumstances?

Whether dealing with agencies or direct clients, translators are often overwhelmed and confused about what’s legal and what’s not in “standard” contracts. Should we sign non-disclosure agreements? If so, when and under what circumstances? What can we do about non-payers or late payers? Are translators always required to waive copyright? In this session, we will cover some of the most frequent questions posed by translators about contracts.

Paula Arturo is a lawyer, translator, and law professor. She is a co-director of Translating Lawyers, a boutique firm specializing in legal translation by lawyers for lawyers.

Paula Arturo is a lawyer, translator, and law professor. She is a co-director of Translating Lawyers, a boutique firm specializing in legal translation by lawyers for lawyers. Throughout her fifteen-year career, in addition to various legal and financial documents, she has also translated several highly technical law books and publications in major international journals for high-profile authors, including several Nobel Prize Laureates and renowned jurists. She is currently a member of the American Translators Association’s Ethics Committee, the ATA Literary Division’s Leadership Council, and the Public Policies Forum of the Supreme Court of Argentina.

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(BP17 04) David Jemielity: The other side of the mirror

BP17 Translation Conference Budapest David Jemielity mirror session card

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What is it like to move from translating content you have little say in to actually helping to create it—or even being the creative director and project lead for an entire brand identity campaign that fundamentally changes the source-language “voice” of your company?

What is it like to move from translating content you have little say in to actually helping to create it—or even being the creative director and project lead for an entire brand identity campaign that fundamentally changes the source-language “voice” of your company? In a word, what’s it like to move over to the other side of the mirror? An in-house team at a Swiss bank did just that.

This short talk tells the story of how, over a period of a decade, Banque Cantonale Vaudoise’s translators gradually transitioned from being a low- to no-visibility unit within the bank, on management’s radar only when something went wrong and at risk of getting outsourced or downsized, to a position right at the center of the bank’s communications.

The lessons their story provides—about communicating to clients, business processes, hiring, training, specializing and collaborating, but most importantly of all, about ambition—are of use to any translator looking to secure a durably compelling career in an age of increasingly good machine translation.

David Jemielity is Senior English Translator and Head of Translations at Banque Cantonale Vaudoise (BCV) in Lausanne, Switzerland. BCV is a mid-sized bank with 2300 employees including 5-8 translators covering English, French, and German.

David Jemielity is Senior English Translator and Head of Translations at Banque Cantonale Vaudoise (BCV) in Lausanne, Switzerland. BCV is a mid-sized bank with 2300 employees including 5-8 translators covering English, French, and German. Since 2012 he has also been a member of the bank’s comité editorial, a 6-person group that sets BCV’s communications policy across languages. He is currently creative director and project lead for the bank’s brand identity campaign, which won both the Prix du Jury and the Prix du Public at the 2014 Swiss Web Program Festival.

Dave is also a tenured faculty member of the University of Geneva’s Faculty of Translation and Interpretation, where he teaches in the graduate French>English track. His research centers on target-text effectiveness in financial translation and high-end translation process design and has been presented widely at conferences in Europe and North America and in print. He was a Distinguished Speaker at the 2010 American Translators Association Annual Conference. Dave is currently working on a chapter devoted to translation in business contexts for the upcoming Routledge Handbook of Translation and Culture, due out in 2017.

Dave studied English and philosophy at Amherst (USA) and Oxford (UK) and has been translating since the early 1990s.

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(BP17 03) Dorota Pawlak: How blogging can help you attract more customers

BP17 Translation Conference Dorota Pawlak blogging session card

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You’ve probably heard about benefits of blogging many times. Increasing online presence, reaching out to more potential customers, showcasing your writing skills… It all sounds great. But the real question is how to do it successfully?

The 21st century witnessed the rise of the digital business. And while marketing used to be ridiculed and vilified by popular 80’s writers, such as Douglas Adams, in today’s online global market everyone agrees that 50% of a business’ success is a good product, and the other 50% a good marketing strategy.

You’ve probably heard about benefits of blogging many times. Increasing online presence, reaching out to more potential customers, showcasing your writing skills… It all sounds great. But the real question is how to do it successfully? What to write about? Where to post your articles? Is your website enough? In this session you’ll learn how to find inspiration for your blog posts, how to determine your target audience and how to promote your articles. Finally, the speaker will share with you a couple of handy tips on how to use LinkedIn Publisher to reach more audience and define your potential customers.

Dorota Pawlak is an English/German into Polish translator and localiser, owner of Polish Localisation and DP Translation Services. She runs online courses on website localisation and writes for her blog Beyond the Words. Dorota is also a co-organiser of All-round Translator events and workshops.

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(BP17 02) Judy Jenner: How to convince clients you’re worth every penny

Declining rates and price sensitivity are two of the realities of our industry – and many other industries as well. However, it’s up to us as entrepreneurs in the language services industry to convince our clients that we are worth every penny.

Declining rates and price sensitivity are two of the realities of our industry – and many other industries as well. However, it’s up to us as entrepreneurs in the language services industry to convince our clients that we are worth every penny. There’s always a segment of the market that is willing to pay adequate rates for top-notch services, and those are the clients we don’t have to convince of our value.

But how do we convince those clients who might be on the fence about retaining us or the similarly priced services of an equally qualified translator or interpreter? Some clients can’t be convinced, but many others can.

Join this fun session that’s packed with practical advice on how to convince clients you’re worth every penny. Hint: it’s partially about shifting the focus away from cost.

Judy Jenner is a Spanish and German business and legal translator and a federally court-certified Spanish interpreter. She has an MBA in marketing and runs her boutique translation and interpreting business, Twin Translations, ….

Judy Jenner is a Spanish and German business and legal translator and a federally court-certified Spanish interpreter. She has an MBA in marketing and runs her boutique translation and interpreting business, Twin Translations, with her twin sister Dagmar. She was born in Austria and grew up in Mexico City.

A former in-house translation department manager, she is a past president of the Nevada Interpreters and Translators Association. She writes the blog Translation Times, pens the “Entrepreneurial Linguist” column for The ATA Chronicle, and is a frequent conference speaker. She is the co-author of The Entrepreneurial Linguist: The Business-School Approach to Freelance Translation.  Judy is also on Twitter.

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(BP17 01) Henry Liu: There will not be any translators in 2025. Really?

BP17 Translation Conference Henry Liu FIT president

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Henry Liu, then president of FIT, the International Federation of Translators, addresses the controversial issue of machine translation and artificial intelligence crowding out human translators in the foreseeable future.

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(BP18 30) Csaba Bán: Conference Wrap-up

BP18 Translation Conference Csaba Bán

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(BP18 29) Michael Farrell: Freelance translator client satisfaction surveys

BP18 Translation Conference Michael Farrell client satisfaction surveys

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While wondering why the flow of work had suddenly stopped during an unusually slack period, the speaker hit on a way of finding out if his clients had been shopping around for other language service providers without actually asking them the rather embarrassing question straight out: ….

While wondering why the flow of work had suddenly stopped during an unusually slack period, the speaker hit on a way of finding out if his clients had been shopping around for other language service providers without actually asking them the rather embarrassing question straight out: with the declared aim of offering services more in line with his clients’ requirements, he sent out a satisfaction questionnaire. The research he did in order to understand the philosophy behind this kind of survey and choose the right questions to ask gave him a totally new perspective on how his clients perceive the quality of the services he offers.

The speaker discusses the kinds of questions typically asked and how appropriate they are to the translation industry. He then illustrates the purpose of each of the questions he actually chose, the answers received and the conclusions he draws. He closes the talk by saying what he has learnt from doing the survey and what he would do differently next time. The presentation is aimed at freelance translators who mainly work with end clients (or intend to do so in the future).

Michael Farrell is primarily a freelance translator and transcreator. Over the years, he has acquired experience in the cultural tourism field and in transcreating advertising copy and press releases, chiefly for the promotion of technology products.

Michael Farrell is primarily a freelance translator and transcreator. Over the years, he has acquired experience in the cultural tourism field and in transcreating advertising copy and press releases, chiefly for the promotion of technology products. Being a keen amateur cook, he also translates texts on Italian cuisine. Besides this, he is an untenured lecturer in post-editing, machine translation and computer tools for translators at the International University of Languages and Media (IULM), Milan, Italy, the developer of the terminology search tool IntelliWebSearch, a qualified member of the Italian Association of Translators and Interpreters (AITI), and member of the Mediterranean Editors and Translators association.

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(BP18 28) Alison Hughes & Adriana Tortoriello: Above and Beyond: the Creative text

BP18 Translation Confere

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Arguably, all translation is a creative process but for the creative industries you can – and should – move away from the source. Alison and Adriana both translate creative texts, but Alison’s texts are more general and allow her to take considerable liberties while Adriana works with tight constraints such as space, images and genre-specific conventions.

Arguably, all translation is a creative process but for the creative industries you can – and should – move away from the source. Alison and Adriana both translate creative texts, but Alison’s texts are more general and allow her to take considerable liberties while Adriana works with tight constraints such as space, images and genre-specific conventions. They will touch on both aspects of creative translation, giving specific examples.

Alison will speak about freedoms in creative translation:

– Taking a step back and asking yourself what the author is saying; changing sentence structure, omitting surplus words, adding new words.

– Focus on meaning and flow;

– Titles;

– Revision.

Adriana will focus on the constraints of creative translation, the interaction of verbal and nonverbal elements in texts and genre-specific conventions. Semiotically complex texts need to be approached by the translator in a very specific way, in order to:

– Avoid redundancy: a text-heavy advert won’t sell or have the desired impact.

– Focus on the message and its intended audience: concise copy.

– Take account of the medium and layout of the target text: expressing the message through font type, size and colour, text distribution, etc.

Alison Hughes is a French-to-English translator and copywriter for the creative industries. She became a freelance translator 20 years ago, after 13 years in the wine and spirits industry, and her move to creative texts happened organically.

Adriana Tortoriello MITI MCIL is an English-Italian translator, transcreator, subtitler and linguistic consultant. She has been translating for over two decades and has lectured and offered workshops at several prestigious UK universities such as Imperial College London and UCL.

Alison Hughes is a French-to-English translator and copywriter for the creative industries. She became a freelance translator 20 years ago, after 13 years in the wine and spirits industry, and her move to creative texts happened organically. She now specialises in wine, food, beauty, fashion and contemporary art. She has been a qualified member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting since 2001 and is the coordinator of its Media, Arts & Tourism network.

Adriana Tortoriello MITI MCIL is an English-Italian translator, transcreator, subtitler and linguistic consultant. She has been translating for over two decades and has lectured and offered workshops at several prestigious UK universities such as Imperial College London and UCL. A qualified member of ITI, she works in various fields of creative translation, with a particular focus on transcreation and audiovisual translation. More info on her website: tortoriellotranslations.com

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(BP18 27) Judy Jenner: The professionalization of our profession

As linguists, it’s very much in the interest of our profession to be better understood, to be higher paid, and to be more respected. We oftentimes think that the outside world does not perceive us as the professionals that we are, but it’s a double-edged sword.

As linguists, it’s very much in the interest of our profession to be better understood, to be higher paid, and to be more respected. We oftentimes think that the outside world does not perceive us as the professionals that we are, but it’s a double-edged sword. Let’s discuss what we can do to make that happen – and about the things we, in aggregate, have not always done well in the past. We have to earn professional respect and rates, and we can, and should all work together to increase the importance of language services in clients’ minds.

Judy will share effective techniques that we can all use to take our profession to the next level. Spoiler alert: raising our profession’s image requires a bit of hard work for everyone, but we should be able to reap great rewards. The speaker will address why we are often our own worst enemies, what women can learn from men in terms of assertiveness, how to deal with critical and timely issues such as sexual harassment, and about the boundaries of ethics.

Judy Jenner is a Spanish and German business and legal translator and a federally court-certified Spanish interpreter in Las Vegas (yes, really). She has an MBA in marketing and runs her boutique translation and interpreting business, Twin Translations, with her twin sister Dagmar.

Judy Jenner is a Spanish and German business and legal translator and a federally court-certified Spanish interpreter in Las Vegas (yes, really). She has an MBA in marketing and runs her boutique translation and interpreting business, Twin Translations, with her twin sister Dagmar. She was born in Austria and grew up in Mexico City. A former in-house translation department manager, she is a past president of the Nevada Interpreters and Translators Association.

She writes the blog Translation Times, pens the “Entrepreneurial Linguist” column for the ATA Chronicle, and is a frequent conference speaker. She is the co-author of “The Entrepreneurial Linguist: The Business-School Approach to Freelance Translation” and helps train the next generation of linguists at the University of California-San Diego. Judy flies a lot and is pretty good at memorizing airport codes.

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(BP18 26) Peter Oehmen: Legal aspects in (technical) translation – Why should I care?

BP18 Translation Conference Peter Oehmen - Legal aspects of technical translations

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Almost every area of translation is more or less embedded in a legal framework. In most cases technical translation is related to technical documentation. Basically this area is governed by three different kinds of law as well as (inter)national standards.

Almost every area of translation is more or less embedded in a legal framework. In most cases technical translation is related to technical documentation. Basically this area is governed by three different kinds of law as well as (inter)national standards. Other areas of translation have their own background of legal regulations.

It always comes in handy to know the rules of the game you play. In my presentation I will provide a broader overview of the translation process and shed some light on the different laws that apply to technical translations as well as on the role of standards. I will briefly touch upon the generally valid aspects of contract law, product liability law as well as health and safety regulations.

After getting those things straight I will share some thoughts and ideas on how technical translators can make use of this knowledge for their market positioning and how to transfer this into value-added services like e.g. compliance management.

Peter Oehmen is the managing partner of Oehmen & Reitsma, a partnership company specialised in translations from Dutch into German and vice versa in the field of renewable energy, electromobility and sustainable building.

Peter Oehmen is the managing partner of Oehmen & Reitsma, a partnership company specialised in translations from Dutch into German and vice versa in the field of renewable energy, electromobility and sustainable building.

Born close to the Dutch border near Düsseldorf, his family moved north and he grew up at the Baltic Sea near Lübeck. After a brief excursus into tax and business consultancy Peter studied civil engineering and enivronmental technology eventually ending up as M.Sc. in Modern Asian History and International Relations. At the moment he is following a training as technical communicator.

Peter’s first professional translation was in 2000. Since then he has been working as freelance translator – until 2007 in part-time and since then in full-time. His clients include some smaller translation and marketing agencies, SMEs as well as educational institutions. He’s fascinated by sustainable technologies in the fields of energy, mobility and construction.

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(BP18 25) Nigel Saych: Take your work seriously but don’t be your own worst enemy

BP18 Translation Conference Nigel Saych Take your work seriously but don't be your worst enemy

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Nigel’s session highlights some of the ways linguists make excuses for themselves. But he is a translator not a psychologist, so he won’t have you leaving the room in tears or heading straight for the bar.

Nigel’s session highlights some of the ways linguists make excuses for themselves. But he is a translator not a psychologist, so he won’t have you leaving the room in tears or heading straight for the bar. You won’t get a checklist of things to do, but you should take with you a whole load of questions to ask yourself. Many translators have an almost sadomasochistic attitude towards the profession, and towards themselves.

Are you brave enough to explore an easier option without letting your standards slip? As with all Nigel’s previous presentations there will be a serious side to his light-hearted approach.

Veteran conference presenter Nigel Saych is handing over the reins of his business to his colleagues and contemplating the past – and the future. Being in charge of a successful translation company in the Netherlands for the past 15 years has taught him many things.

Veteran conference presenter Nigel Saych is handing over the reins of his business to his colleagues and contemplating the past – and the future. Being in charge of a successful translation company in the Netherlands for the past 15 years has taught him many things. One of these is the way other linguists see themselves. Nigel has enough friends in the business, he can afford to lose a few. But that will only happen if people take themselves too seriously…

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(BP18 24) Nigel Wheatley: Translation with style

BP18 Translation Conference Nigel Wheatley Translation with style

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Translators are presumed to be experts in the grammar of their target language and the terminology of the field they are dealing with. But what about those cases where they have to make a judgement call, where the rules of the target language are either imprecise or seem inappropriate for a given scenario?

Translators are presumed to be experts in the grammar of their target language and the terminology of the field they are dealing with. But what about those cases where they have to make a judgement call, where the rules of the target language are either imprecise or seem inappropriate for a given scenario? Every translator will find themselves in these situations, and some cases may come up repeatedly. This presentation will look at why a translator should keep a record of these judgement calls in their own personal style guide, what they should include in that style guide, and how they can use it as a tool in their marketing.

Translators are presumed to be experts in the grammar of their target language and the terminology of the field they are dealing with. But what about those cases where they have to make a judgement call, where the rules of the target language are either imprecise or seem inappropriate for a given scenario?

Nigel Wheatley originally trained as a chemist and has researched and taught at several European universities. He was also a schoolteacher in France and literary agent in Spain before returning to his native United Kingdom and starting Vis Verborum, specialising in the translation of medical and pharmaceutical texts from French, Spanish and Catalan into English: he now splits his time between the UK and Prague. He is interested in questions of quality assessment and quality assurance in translation, and the tools available to individual translators to improve their work and their services.

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(BP18 23) Joy Phillips: Personal challenges in a professional context

BP18 Translation Conference Joy Phillips Personal challenges in a professional context

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Freelancing offers more freedom, but also involves more risk and responsibility. Many of us juggle challenging personal factors – acute or chronic illness, ageing parents needing full-time care, major life changes – that frequently place unexpected demands on our ability to cope with our professional obligations.

Freelancing offers more freedom, but also involves more risk and responsibility. Many of us juggle challenging personal factors – acute or chronic illness, ageing parents needing full-time care, major life changes – that frequently place unexpected demands on our ability to cope with our professional obligations. Let’s discuss how to build in redundancy from the start, establish a network of trusted colleagues, and keep our customers satisfied without risking a burnout by living at the edge of our limits for too long.

Joy Phillips is a court-certified Dutch>English translator, author’s editor and entrepreneur with 21 years of experience in helping fiction writers, researchers, companies, NGOs and government agencies convey their concepts to a broader international audience.

Joy Phillips is a court-certified Dutch>English translator, author’s editor and entrepreneur with 21 years of experience in helping fiction writers, researchers, companies, NGOs and government agencies convey their concepts to a broader international audience. Strong focus on climate and environment, IT and telecom, technology and innovation, and creative design; fiercely dedicated to keeping her industry-specific knowledge up to par.

An inveterate bookaholic and irrepressible extrovert who has lived more than half her life over 9000 km from where she was born, Joy is fascinated by language, food, coffee & speculative fiction. Over the past few years, she has invested an improbable amount of time in establishing a small network of trusted colleagues, The Language Collective, to serve her customers better.

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(BP18 22) Dr Jonathan Downie: Pitching for people who hate sales and marketing

If there is one thing that strikes fear into many translators and interpreters, it is marketing and selling their own services. Yet, if there is one thing that many translators and interpreters love, it is writing and talking about their work.

If there is one thing that strikes fear into many translators and interpreters, it is marketing and selling their own services. Yet, if there is one thing that many translators and interpreters love, it is writing and talking about their work. This hands-on session will show how our love of writing and speaking can be turned into pitches that clients love and which make them want to hire us.

Based on the simple example of pitching to client magazines, the workshop then extends the techniques out to price quotes and contacting potential clients. At all stages, the emphasis is on talking about our services in terms of the value they bring to clients, using terms that clients are familiar with.

Dr Jonathan Downie is a consultant interpreter, researcher and author on interpreting. His first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence was published by Routledge in 2016 and won Best Interpreting Book at the ProZ.com Community Choice Awards.

Dr Jonathan Downie is a consultant interpreter, researcher and author on interpreting. His first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence was published by Routledge in 2016 and won Best Interpreting Book at the ProZ.com Community Choice Awards. He has also written for several client-facing magazines and publications such as Flybe’s Flight Time magazine, the Conference News and Eventopedia blogs, Executive Assistant and Executive Secretary magazine.

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(BP18 21) Marek Buchtel: Translator in the cloud

BP18 Translation Conference Marek Buchtel Translator in the cloud

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With the rapid development of technologies and processes, a translator‘s working environment is changing rapidly. What we knew and used two years ago may not be good enough and sufficient today. As our main focus is on translation and interpreting, …

With the rapid development of technologies and processes, a translator‘s working environment is changing rapidly. What we knew and used two years ago may not be good enough and sufficient today. As our main focus is on translation and interpreting, we may not have the time and opportunity to closely monitor the development in other areas.
This session will provide a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art technologies, tools and processes that are available to translators today. We will cover the latest options in hardware (desktops, notebooks, tablets, mobiles), the software that is relevant for translators on each platform (operating systems, software for communication, analysis, quality assurance, word processing, file processing, etc.), CAT tools (both local and cloud-based), backup solutions, storage solutions, resources, communication and connectivity, as well as the best practices.
The session will not cover the basics, but only the latest developments that many of us may not be aware of. There will be time reserved for discussion and sharing the experience, knowledge and best practices from the audience.

Marek Buchtel has been a freelance translator (English/Czech) for more than 20 years. He primarily works with business, marketing, legal and IT translations as well as website/software localization.

Marek Buchtel has been a freelance translator (English/Czech) for more than 20 years. He primarily works with business, marketing, legal and IT translations as well as website/software localization. He majored in information technology and philosophy at the University of Economics in Prague, Czech Republic, and studied English/Czech translation and interpreting at the Institute of Translation Studies – Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.
He’s keen on new technologies, keeping up with the latest developments in the world of computers, communications, home electronics and gadgets, and always on the lookout for better and more efficient ways of doing his job.

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(BP18 20) Lloyd Bingham: Dealing with Denglish & other source language interference

BP18 Translation Conference Lloyd Bingham Dealing with Denglish and other source interferences

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Denglish, Dunglish, Franglais, Spanglish… they can all be deceptive. Especially when you find out that your friend’s new “beamer” is not a BMW, but a projector. Taking source language terms borrowed from English at face value is a rookie mistake, with often hilarious yet catastrophic consequences.

Denglish, Dunglish, Franglais, Spanglish… they can all be deceptive. Especially when you find out that your friend’s new “beamer” is not a BMW, but a projector. Taking source language terms borrowed from English at face value is a rookie mistake, with often hilarious yet catastrophic consequences. While it might be cool to drop English words into other languages, the meaning is often corrupted, leaving us translators scratching our heads. This presentation will first look at how other languages have given English words new meanings that you won’t find in the dictionary, and how translators can translate them.

Then we’ll look at ways to avoid source language interference from a style point of view and how to opt for more idiomatic formulations. Real-life examples will be taken from German and Dutch into English translations, but translators of other language combinations will be able to take away ideas to make their texts sound more natural in terms of both terminology and style.

Lloyd Bingham runs Capital Translations in Cardiff, UK. A former in-house translator, he works from German, Dutch, French and Spanish into English, specialising in business, marketing and education. Lloyd is a qualified member of the UK’s Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) and Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIOL).

Lloyd Bingham runs Capital Translations in Cardiff, UK. A former in-house translator, he works from German, Dutch, French and Spanish into English, specialising in business, marketing and education. Lloyd is a qualified member of the UK’s Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) and Chartered Institute of Linguists (CIOL). He is also a tutor on ITI’s Starting Up as a Freelance Translator course and a committee member of ITI Cymru Wales. In addition to a linguistic curiosity about English interference in other languages, Lloyd takes a keen interest in online presence-building and professional conduct for freelance translators.

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(BP18 19) Caterina Saccani: How to gain more visibility in your target market

Who says you can only be successful at marketing your translation and interpreting services if you are an extrovert? Everyone can leverage their strengths, qualifications and passions to position themselves as the go-to resource in a given target market.

Who says you can only be successful at marketing your translation and interpreting services if you are an extrovert? Everyone can leverage their strengths, qualifications and passions to position themselves as the go-to resource in a given target market. During this session we will discuss several marketing and PR strategies that have turned out to bring success to freelance translators in terms of achieving greater visibility, and can be applied according to the translator’s personality.

You will learn how to expand your comfort zone, think out of the box and break new grounds, but also how to maximize your talents if you are not the most outgoing person on earth. After this session, you might decide it’s about time to break your terror barrier and give a talk at a conference in your target group or leverage your excellent writing skills and submit an article to one of the magazines most read by your target groups.

Caterina Saccani is a freelance Italian conference interpreter and translator specializing in legal texts and marketing copy for the green industry. She was born and raised in Northern Italy and she’s now based in Aachen (Germany) and Genk (Belgium), but she tends to consider herself a world citizen.

Caterina Saccani is a freelance Italian conference interpreter and translator specializing in legal texts and marketing copy for the green industry. She was born and raised in Northern Italy and she’s now based in Aachen (Germany) and Genk (Belgium), but she tends to consider herself a world citizen.

Claudia’s working languages are Italian, German, English and Dutch. One of her missions is to help raise awareness about our profession through professional associations and other networks. She’s also a serial networker who loves bringing people together.

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(BP18 18) Marek Pawelec: Know your tools

BP18 Translation Conference Marek Pawelec know your tools

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Every craftsman knows his/her tools. Which one is used for which task, how to use them and how to distinguish seemingly similar tools perfected for different purposes. You know, you can use steel drill bit for drilling wood, but you’ll get better results using bit designed for wood.

Every craftsman knows his/her tools. Which one is used for which task, how to use them and how to distinguish seemingly similar tools perfected for different purposes. You know, you can use steel drill bit for drilling wood, but you’ll get better results using bit designed for wood. Good craftsman also takes good care of his/her tools because he or she knows that his/her income and safety depends on them. This is true for carpenters but also for translators.

We need to know which tool is best for any given job, how to fine-tune it and how to use it in the most efficient way. In this presentation/discussion we will talk about what tools do we use for the different tasks (e.g. PDF conversion, source file clean-up, translation, QA), how do we choose them and how can we fine-tune them to work best. Because it’s not about which tool is the best. It’s about which tool is the best for you for the job at hand. Expect practical tips for different workflows and software tools configurations.

Marek Pawelec is a life sciences researcher turned translator – he translates medicine, chemistry and science fiction. After spending several years as a researcher at university faculties of medicine and chemistry, in 2001 he turned full-time freelance translator.

Marek Pawelec is a life sciences researcher turned translator – he translates medicine, chemistry and science fiction. After spending several years as a researcher at university faculties of medicine and chemistry, in 2001 he turned full-time freelance translator. Marek translated millions of words of words of medical texts and his favorite subject is IVD and 34 novels and counting. He’s technically minded and lazy, so he’s always looking for ways to simplify and speed up work with various tools and processes. He knows his way around regular expressions and complex file formats. Certified memoQ trainer, offers help with file filters.

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(BP18 17) Jo Rourke: Writing your About page

BP18 Translation Conference Jo Rourke Writing your About page

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We’re not programmed to confidently state why someone should “pick” us, which is why writing the About page of your website is so difficult. That’s why flipping the meaning of the page, and making it about your ideal clients (and not you and your cat), can make things easier.

We’re not programmed to confidently state why someone should “pick” us, which is why writing the About page of your website is so difficult. That’s why flipping the meaning of the page, and making it about your ideal clients (and not you and your cat), can make things easier. This workshop will take you through 5 steps to crafting an About page that makes potential clients nod manically at their computer screen and make a beeline for your contact page. The 5 things we’ll look at are:

1. Identify the problem
2. The “Don’t Worry” stage
3. Introduce yourself
4. Add some credibility
5. Call to action

At the end of the session, you’ll be rid of your writer’s block and ready to write!

Jo Rourke talks a LOT. She talks so much that she’s going to talk on both days of BP18. Luckily for you she’s okay at it – it’s kind of her job. She’s been a translator and copywriter for, ahem, a while (15 years) and she works from Spanish, Portuguese and French into English.

Jo Rourke talks a LOT. She talks so much that she’s going to talk on both days of BP18. Luckily for you she’s okay at it – it’s kind of her job. She’s been a translator and copywriter for, ahem, a while (15 years) and she works from Spanish, Portuguese and French into English. For copywriting she sticks to English. It’s safer (more opportunity for puns.) She specialises in talking, translating, talking, copywriting and talking. You’ll understand when you see her. If you want to try and get a word in you can…

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(BP18 16) Alessandra Martelli: Translating your client’s personality

BP18 Translation Conference Alessandra Martelli Translating your client's personality

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Marketing translations and transcreations are all about grasping your client’s personality, and translating their tone of voice in a way that “sounds like them”. While larger corporates usually provide details about these key aspects, small and mid-sized businesses often don’t.

Marketing translations and transcreations are all about grasping your client’s personality, and translating their tone of voice in a way that “sounds like them”. While larger corporates usually provide details about these key aspects, small and mid-sized businesses often don’t. And this can lead to bland translations and adaptations that fail to convert. In this talk, we’ll explore how “personality” and “tone of voice” shine through marketing copy. Building on real-life examples, we’ll see how translators can transform brief details into words that work. Also, we’ll discuss how translators can infer the client’s personality from the source text – and thoughtfully bring it to life in another language.

Key learning points of the session:

• Understanding what tone of voice is;

• Exploring the relationship between tone of voice and word choice;

• Using “textual indicators” to grasp and translate the client’s personality.

Alessandra Martelli is an Italian translator and copywriter. She writes and translates (from English and German) marketing and PR content, tourism texts, and medical content for small businesses and large corporates alike. Alessandra is also a trainer with a qualification in teaching, and the author of 21 Free Tools for Translators (2016).

Alessandra Martelli is an Italian translator and copywriter. She writes and translates (from English and German) marketing and PR content, tourism texts, and medical content for small businesses and large corporates alike. Alessandra is also a trainer with a qualification in teaching, and the author of 21 Free Tools for Translators (2016). She enjoys sharing thoughts on effective communication and freelancing on her blog, and hates writing about herself in the third person. She’s an avid traveller, and a bibliophile with a passion for etymology. Alessandra is an Associate of ITI (UK) and a member of ACTA (Italy).

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(BP18 15) Dolores Guiñazú & Gabriella Escarrá: Master the Game: Maximise your QA

BP18 Translation Conference Dolores Guinazu Gabriella Escarrá Master the Game Maximize your QA

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Have you ever encountered quality issues despite having run the Spell Check and other quality checks included in your CAT tools? Have you ever felt that some checks are time-consuming or impossible to do manually, but at the same time they are extremely important to ensure the best final quality of your translations?

Have you ever encountered quality issues despite having run the Spell Check and other quality checks included in your CAT tools? Have you ever felt that some checks are time-consuming or impossible to do manually, but at the same time they are extremely important to ensure the best final quality of your translations?

This session aims at introducing some stand-alone Quality Assurance (QA) tools and providing a better understanding of several processes to be followed in order to boost the quality of translations. In this presentation, participants will learn about some useful software tools that can help translators and/or editors maximise their time and focus on more creative aspects of the translation.

Besides, the audience will get an insight on international quality standards for translation services which specify the requirements for all aspects of the translation process directly affecting the quality and delivery of translation services. This includes some provisions for translation service providers (TSPs) concerning the management of core processes, the availability and management of resources, and other necessary actions.

Dolores Guiñazú is an English>Spanish translator. She is from Chaco, a northern province in Argentina and began her career as an in-house translator for multinational corporations. /  Gabriela Escarrá is an English>Spanish translator, editor, transcreator and copywriter specializing in Marketing and Corporate Communications.

Dolores Guiñazú is a certified sworn (court-approved) English>Spanish translator. She is from Chaco, a northern province in Argentina and began her career as an in-house translator for multinational corporations. For the past years, she has been a full-time translator working in teams and with colleagues for global agencies and direct clients all around the world. She has an MBA in marketing from the Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires and the University at Albany, State University of New York. She is also a Spanish copyeditor and proofreader certified by Fundación Litterae and Fundación del Español Urgente (Fundéu). Her main areas of specialization are business documentation, health care, marketing, and legal and corporate communications.

Gabriela Escarrá is a Certified Sworn English>Spanish translator, editor, transcreator and copywriter specializing in Marketing and Corporate Communications. She graduated from the UNLP both as a Translator and as a Teacher of English Language and Literature. With over 20 years of experience in professional translation, she has worked on several projects for the United Nations Development Programme (UNPD), translation agencies, and directly with clients, including private corporations, professional associations, and government agencies. She has also been a University Professor of Technical Translations at the School of Economics, UCLP.

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(BP18 14) Andriy Yasharov: An amazingly fast and almost free way to specialize

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Identifying and pursuing a specialization can be overwhelming for a generalist translator who decided to become specialized in one of the well-paid areas, such as law, medicine, engineering, IT, finance, life sciences and others. This is also true for established linguists who made up their mind …

Identifying and pursuing a specialization can be overwhelming for a generalist translator who decided to become specialized in one of the well-paid areas, such as law, medicine, engineering, IT, finance, life sciences and others. This is also true for established linguists who made up their mind that it’s high time they started translating in a different area. Of course, for some highly technical texts a strong educational background is a must, however, it’s not unusual for translators to be self-taught in the areas of specialization that they chose. My personal experience proves that.

But how is it that some professionals achieve their goals faster and more efficient than others? Nothing can be entirely free and super easy, let’s face the truth, but there are always some ways to use other means available to anyone in order to reach your specialization goals. Using those means will require some of your time, dedication, motivation and strong will and I’ll provide the knowledge of what to choose, where to look and how to use.

Andriy Yasharov is a freelance English to Russian/Ukrainian translator with 13 years of professional experience in the industry. During his translation career, he changed several specializations at which he excelled. Many years ago, he used to translate in the education sector for educational institutions.

Andriy Yasharov is a freelance English to Russian/Ukrainian translator with 13 years of professional experience in the industry. During his translation career, he changed several specializations at which he excelled. Many years ago, he used to translate in the education sector for educational institutions. A few years later, Andriy became a translator for the steelmaking industry. In 2010 he went abroad to work as a translator for businesses engaged in coal mining. And it wasn’t until 2013 that he became what he is now: a life sciences translator. Want to learn more about him? Check out his ProZ.com profile.

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(BP18 08) Carolina Walliter: A killer CV: Let’s go visual!

BP18 Translation Conference Carolina Walliter: A killer CV: let's get visual

Similar topics

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It’s getting increasingly harder to absorb written information nowadays with the large amount of content we consume from different media. And what does this have to do with your translator career? Everything. The language service industry also has to cope with the onslaught of information to which we are exposed on a daily basis:

It’s getting increasingly harder to absorb written information nowadays with the large amount of content we consume from different media. And what does this have to do with your translator career? Everything. The language service industry also has to cope with the onslaught of information to which we are exposed on a daily basis: agencies receive many CVs a day, most of them failing to properly target the desired position. In such scenario, even highly qualified translators can be overlooked by recruiters. As human communication gets increasingly visual in the 21st century, couldn’t we use a bit of innovation to prospect clients?

This session will present the concept of visual CVs and provide tips on how you can make your CV stand out in the crowd.

Carolina Walliter is a Brazilian historian, translator, conference interpreter, and copywriter with over 6 years’ experience in corporate communications, marketing, tourism, human resources, and e-commerce. She contributes to the translation community with her blog, Pronoia Tradutória, …

Carolina Walliter is a Brazilian historian, translator, conference interpreter, and copywriter with over 6 years’ experience in corporate communications, marketing, tourism, human resources, and e-commerce. She contributes to the translation community with her blog, Pronoia Tradutória, where she addresses some of the challenges she and her peers face in the LSA industry. She also blogs about how does it feel to be a woman solopreneur, encouraging fellow colleagues to embrace the profession as an act of self-discovery and empowerment. Self-proclaimed coworking evangelist and digital nomad, Carolina enjoys spreading the word about new and untraditional ways of working in the quest for the so-called work-life balance.

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(BP18 04) Carlos la Orden Tovar: Why your nice profile isn’t attracting any clients

BP18 Translation Conference Carlos la Orden Tovar Why your nice profile isn't attracting any clients

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You have all the winning cards to thrive in the translation business. Formal qualifications. Check. A wide range of services. Check. A website that you crafted in order to boost your visibility. Check. You are meticulous, resourceful and have reasonable experience.

You have all the winning cards to thrive in the translation business. Formal qualifications. Check. A wide range of services. Check. A website that you crafted in order to boost your visibility. Check. You are meticulous, resourceful and have reasonable experience. You even subscribed for a couple of industry associations. Check, check, check. Yet, you still struggle to hit decent projects, acquire regular clients and quit submitting your CV ten times a day to every living business and language service company out there.

Why? Why me? Why NOT me?

The reason behind that empty inbox isn’t your lack of experience. It is the MESSAGE. It is not about you. It never was. It is about your clients. I will help you shape your message in order to make you speak the same language as your clients: No matter how many languages you already speak, you need to learn this one. Learn to focus on a specific industry and its motivations, know your potential clients and craft an irresistible message.

Carlos la Orden Tovar has forged a professional career linked to Information Technology, Languages and Education across Europe and America. In the last two decades, Carlos has lived and developed his skills in 10 different countries, proudly working as a Technology Trainer, Localization Project Manager, ….

Carlos has forged a professional career linked to Information Technology, Languages and Education across Europe and America. In the last two decades, Carlos has lived and developed his skills in 10 different countries, proudly working as a Technology Trainer, Localization Project Manager, School & University Teacher and Freelance Translator. Over the years, he has worked with dozens of international clients such as Microsoft, 3M, Cisco, Oracle, AENA, United Techhologies, Movistar and Nokia, to name a few.

His natural inclination towards sharing knowledge and gathering new experiences has driven his career through unbeaten paths, mixing academic and business life in an ever-changing global scenario. He lives in the beautiful city of Bologna and splits his time as a Lecturer at Universidad Internacional de la Rioja, Speaker and freelance Language Consultant and Localizer.

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(BP18 03) Jeanette Brickner: Your CPD plan for 21st century business

BP18 Translation Conference Jeanette Brickner CPD plan for 21st century business

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It is now well-recognized that lifelong education is a must for success in today’s workforce. This is particularly true for translators and interpreters. Luckily, your options for pursuing CPD opportunities that are relevant to your business are almost limitless.

It is now well-recognized that lifelong education is a must for success in today’s workforce. This is particularly true for translators and interpreters. Luckily, your options for pursuing CPD opportunities that are relevant to your business are almost limitless. This talk will broadly touch on different fields and levels of commitment that you can pursue through continuing education and professional development. We will then look at various schools of thought on how to make sure that you have a personalized CPD plan that is appropriately tailored to meet the specific needs of your individual business while keeping your service offerings relevant to your customers.

Jeanette Brickner is a German to English translator with a decade of experience in the language services industry and eight years in translation. Now specialized in automotive and marketing translations, she worked as a research assistant in the Language Resource Center at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.

Jeanette Brickner is a German to English translator with a decade of experience in the language services industry and eight years in translation. Now specialized in automotive and marketing translations, she worked as a research assistant in the Language Resource Center at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Her primary duties there involved consulting with faculty and developing mainly technology-based solutions to meet the needs of more than a dozen language-related departments, including the Translation program and the School of Continuing Education. Based in Prague, she is passionate about encouraging other translators to pursue lifelong learning opportunities.

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(BP18 09) Sameh Ragab: Web scraping for translators

BP18 Translation Conference Sameh Ragab Web scraping for translators

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Publicly available web data scraping is important for any type of the business and translation is no exception. Data Scraping lets you automate so many processes that not only save you time, but boost your translation business in every sense of the word.

Publicly available web data scraping is important for any type of the business and translation is no exception. Data Scraping lets you automate so many processes that not only save you time, but boost your translation business in every sense of the word. This session will introduce you to the advantage of web scraping in creating terminology empires, and enhancing your glossary management. Hence, data scraping comes in to picture here. You collect data that is spread across the internet and use it to boost your productivity on all levels.

Sameh Ragab is an ISO 17100 Lead Auditor and Certified Translation Provider, CAT Tools and Terminology Management Expert, UN and World Bank Registered Translation Vendor, DTP specialist, and Certified Localizer.

Sameh Ragab is an ISO 17100 Lead Auditor and Certified Translation Provider, CAT Tools and Terminology Management Expert, UN and World Bank Registered Translation Vendor, DTP specialist, and Certified Localizer. A renowned international speaker and trainer focusing on the technical side of translation, Sam has over 26 years of expertise in the translation and localization industry and sets the benchmarks for quality work, with a focus on Arabic and Middle Eastern translation, localization and DTP services.

Moreover, Sam has an outstanding history in training translators and localizers to excel using latest CAT and Terminology Management tools. Sam has given workshops and conference talks in 14 countries and his hobbies include fishing, angling, snorkeling, scuba diving and swimming.

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(BP18 06) Jo Rourke: Why we’re getting value all wrong

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Maybe it was the multi-million pound deal they brokered because you interpreted at the meeting. Or the time they saved because you handled their brochure translation. It might have been the litigation they avoided because of your knowledge of their country’s legal system.

Maybe it was the multi-million pound deal they brokered because you interpreted at the meeting. Or the time they saved because you handled their brochure translation. It might have been the litigation they avoided because of your knowledge of their country’s legal system.

Talking to clients in the language of their business means you become so much more than just good value for money. You become invaluable. How do you figure out your value? Well, you start by asking questions, which can be scary. But if you’re asking the right questions, your client won’t mind…in fact, they’ll welcome it.

Let’s talk about your true value…and maybe, just maybe, it might help you value yourself.

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(BP18 07) Tom Imhof: Will AI, DL, and neural MT change our lives?

BP18 Translation Conference Tom Imhof Will AI, DL and neural MT change our lives?

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In this session we will take a closer look at artificial intelligence, deep learning and neural machine translation. We will have a look into the past, at the present and into the future of MT and we will try to find answers to the following questions: Where do these new technologies come from, ….

In this session we will take a closer look at artificial intelligence, deep learning and neural machine translation. We will have a look into the past, at the present and into the future of MT and we will try to find answers to the following questions: Where do these new technologies come from, how did they develop over the past few years and where are the going?

How can translation professionals make use of the new technology? What is the impact on the translation industry? And will AI, DL and MT change our professional lives? How will the job description of the professional translator look like in 10 years? Will there still be translators or merely post editors?

Having studied Russian and English at Heidelberg university, Tom Imhof started his career as a Russian translator and terminologist at Mannesmann Demag, a German heavy engineering company.

Having studied Russian and English at Heidelberg university, Tom Imhof started his career as a Russian translator and terminologist at Mannesmann Demag, a German heavy engineering company. From 1998 he worked as Product Development Manager for MultiTerm and later as Enterprise Support Manager EMEA at Trados GmbH and SDL Trados Technologies.

In 2009, Tom Imhof founded localix.biz – language technology consulting in Hamburg. The mission of localix.biz is to provide every stakeholder in the language industry with an affordable and smooth start into using CAT and translation workflow systems.

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(BP18 11) Ellen Singer: Cross-pollination

BP18 Translation Conference Ellen Singer Cross-pollination

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The market is changing. Fewer agencies provide added value and more customers are reaching out to freelancers to reduce costs but also because of the personal touch. The customer needs a product that is finished, either from the freelancer or an agency. Translators cannot all have the same skills set.

The market is changing. Fewer agencies provide added value and more customers are reaching out to freelancers to reduce costs but also because of the personal touch. The customer needs a product that is finished, either from the freelancer or an agency. Translators cannot all have the same skills set. Which is why we should cooperate with other freelancers and (small) agencies to provide what the customer needs. This ensures the customer is loyal and does not go fishing in other ponds…

This talk will address various different ways to cooperate with others to provide a quality product. There are various factors to consider. Specialization and the language combination can be identical or different or even the opposite. An additional skill or two. It takes time to put teams together. When you have a versatile team behind you, achieving life-work balance also becomes easier. There will be feast and famine, but the highs and lows will be less severe and the work will be more interesting! And best of all, having them in your team, means you are in their team, their marketing is also your marketing.

Ellen Singer has been a technical translator for more than twenty years at AzTech Solutions, a small translation agency that provides a wide range of services. Although she specializes in technical translation and has used CAT tools since the nineties, Ellen’s interests and skills are far-ranging.

Ellen Singer has been a technical translator for more than twenty years at AzTech Solutions, a small translation agency that provides a wide range of services. Although she specializes in technical translation and has used CAT tools since the nineties, Ellen’s interests and skills are far-ranging. She relishes the challenge of projects requiring creativity and rhyming skills, as well as transcreation projects, and she has spoken at translation conferences on a wide range of topics. Ellen and Enrico manage their business and three children together.

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(BP18 12) Dr Jonathan Downie: For business’ sake, get off your butt!

BP18 Translation Conference Jonathan Downie For business sake get off your butt

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This session has a simple theme: if we want to grow our businesses and improve how people perceive our work, we need to get into the worlds where our clients live. From meeting giant events agencies at tradeshows to sharing a nice cup of tea in a Convention Bureau, this talk tells the ongoing story …

This session has a simple theme: if we want to grow our businesses and improve how people perceive our work, we need to get into the worlds where our clients live. From meeting giant events agencies at tradeshows to sharing a nice cup of tea in a Convention Bureau, this talk tells the ongoing story of what happens when one interpreter decides to go from passively waiting for jobs to plunging headlong into meeting potential clients on their turf.

With more and more work platforms for translators and interpreters being created every day and thousands of marketing experts telling us that we can gain great clients without ever getting out of our pyjamas, in this talk I will argue that face-to-face meetings (and cups of tea) will always be a vital part of any growing business and I will share stories of the expected and unexpected results of being committed to leaving the house to find clients.

Dr Jonathan Downie is a consultant interpreter, researcher and author on interpreting. His first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence was published by Routledge in 2016 and won Best Interpreting Book at the ProZ.com Community Choice Awards.

Dr Jonathan Downie is a consultant interpreter, researcher and author on interpreting. His first book, Being a Successful Interpreter: Adding Value and Delivering Excellence was published by Routledge in 2016 and won Best Interpreting Book at the ProZ.com Community Choice Awards. He has also written for several client-facing magazines and publications such as Flybe’s Flight Time magazine, the Conference News and Eventopedia blogs, Executive Assistant and Executive Secretary magazine.

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(BP18 10) Gary Smith: The customer is always right. Not.

BP18 Translation Conference speaker Gary Smith

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We’ve all had them. The marketing department that wants to sell air conditioning to Eskimos and central heating in Saudi Arabia. The boss who spent two weeks at a language school in London and thus considers himself an expert in translation. The customer is always right, as the saying goes. But sometimes they’re completely wrong.

We’ve all had them. The marketing department that wants to sell air conditioning to Eskimos and central heating in Saudi Arabia. The boss who spent two weeks at a language school in London and thus considers himself an expert in translation. The customer is always right, as the saying goes. But sometimes they’re completely wrong. Translation is one of those professions that are a mystery to many clients, who can’t even understand the end product they are buying. Many think they can do it roughly themselves, so they often have strong opinions about what they want without sufficient knowledge to understand when they are in fact wrong. In such situations it would be easy to throw up our hands and give the client what they think they want, with disastrous results. Instead, take a deep breath and see the funny side of the situation. Translators need to allay our clients’ fears by helping them understand the potential pitfalls of their meddling too much with the text, while understanding ourselves that the client’s input is essential to give them the service they really seek. This talk aims to give some ideas as to how to do this with a little humour.

Gary Smith has given presentations at many international translation congresses over the years. He is a member and former president of the Valencia Region Association of Translators and Interpreters (XarxaTIV), and represents Spain for the International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI).

Gary Smith has given presentations at many international translation congresses over the years. He is a member and former president of the Valencia Region Association of Translators and Interpreters (XarxaTIV), and represents Spain for the International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI). He translates from Spanish>English and Catalan>English. A British native, he has lived in Spain for over 25 years. Although he is originally from a scientific and technical background, today he also works with mercantile and labour law. He translates for various Spanish universities and has translated books by famous authors. He is also the author of the award-winning book, “Confessions of a Freelance Translator”.

Web: www.Glokalize.com    Twitter: @GaryGlokalize

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(BP18 08) Carolina Walliter: A killer CV – Let’s get visual

BP18 Translation Conference Carolina Walliter: A killer CV: let's get visual

Similar topics

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It’s getting increasingly harder to absorb written information nowadays with the large amount of content we consume from different media. And what does this have to do with your translator career? Everything. The language service industry also has to cope with the onslaught of information to which we are exposed on a daily basis:  …

It’s getting increasingly harder to absorb written information nowadays with the large amount of content we consume from different media. And what does this have to do with your translator career? Everything. The language service industry also has to cope with the onslaught of information to which we are exposed on a daily basis: agencies receive many CVs a day, most of them failing to properly target the desired position. In such scenario, even highly qualified translators can be overlooked by recruiters. As human communication gets increasingly visual in the 21st century, couldn’t we use a bit of innovation to prospect clients?

This session will present the concept of visual CVs and provide tips on how you can make your CV stand out in the crowd.

Carolina Walliter is a Brazilian historian, translator, conference interpreter, and copywriter with over 6 years’ experience in corporate communications, marketing, tourism, human resources, and e-commerce. She contributes to the translation community with her blog, Pronoia Tradutória,  ….

Carolina Walliter is a Brazilian historian, translator, conference interpreter, and copywriter with over 6 years’ experience in corporate communications, marketing, tourism, human resources, and e-commerce. She contributes to the translation community with her blog, Pronoia Tradutória, where she addresses some of the challenges she and her peers face in the LSA industry. She also blogs about how does it feel to be a woman solopreneur, encouraging fellow colleagues to embrace the profession as an act of self-discovery and empowerment. Self-proclaimed coworking evangelist and digital nomad, Carolina enjoys spreading the word about new and untraditional ways of working in the quest for the so-called work-life balance.

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(BP18 01) João Roque Dias: What’s going on? (In our profession, that is)

BP18 Translation Conference Joao Roque Dias

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What’s going on?In our profession, that is. Let’s ask ourselves some questions, all related to the master question of this talk: What’s going on? My task will be to provide you with some clues but, with no answers. All questions, I promise, will be about us, our profession, our clients and, of course, our money.

What’s going on?

In our profession, that is. Let’s ask ourselves some questions, all related to the master question of this talk: What’s going on? My task will be to provide you with some clues but, with no answers. All questions, I promise, will be about us, our profession, our clients and, of course, our money: Are you still bidding for jobs online? Seriously? We need 230 words within 2 hours, or 5 “linguists” to share the job. Really? Are we earning enough? Enough for what? Why is money pouring in into the translation market? Isn’t there anything more profitable? I saved the best one for last: how to hang yourself, with you providing the rope, the beam and even the bench to kick (caution: very graphic images will be shown).

João Roque Dias is a mechanical engineer and a technical translator. Undertaken various duties in engineering, consulting and construction companies in Portugal, Israel, Denmark, United States, Bermuda, Angola, Mozambique and Dubai. Member of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM International).

João Roque Dias is a mechanical engineer and a technical translator. Undertaken various duties in engineering, consulting and construction companies in Portugal, Israel, Denmark, United States, Bermuda, Angola, Mozambique and Dubai. Member of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM International).

Independent translator since 1989 and Certified Translator (CT) by the ATA (English-Portuguese), since 1993. ATA Accreditation Exams Grader from 1994 until 2001. Member of the International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI). Invited speaker at several translator conferences in Argentina, Brazil, Czech Republic, France, Israel, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, the United States and, now, Austria. Author of several articles and glossaries related to Technical Translation and Mechanical Engineering.

João’s professional website is at www.jrdias.com and he tweets about everything technically translated at @PORTranslation.

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(BP18 05) Claudia Befu: Marketing localization: Translation, transcreation, or copywriting

BP18 Translation Conference Claudia Befu Marketing localization: translation, transcreation or copywriting

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The 21st century witnessed the rise of the digital business. And while marketing used to be ridiculed and vilified by popular 80’s writers, such as Douglas Adams, in today’s online global market everyone agrees that 50% of a business’ success is a good product, and the other 50% a good marketing strategy.

The 21st century witnessed the rise of the digital business. And while marketing used to be ridiculed and vilified by popular 80’s writers, such as Douglas Adams, in today’s online global market everyone agrees that 50% of a business’ success is a good product, and the other 50% a good marketing strategy.

Marketing localization is a crucial service for any business that wants to reach a global audience. But how can a professional working in the language services industry come up with the right localization strategy for each and every client?

The first step is a good definition of marketing localization as a service. Is all marketing localization transcreation? What exactly is transcreation and how does it differ from translation or copywriting? If you localize content are you still a translator or are you a localizer? And why do we need localization after all?

If you ever had to answer one or several of the above questions and you didn’t know where to start, join this session. We will have a look at different localization techniques and current marketing content trends.

Claudia Befu is a localization expert with 10+ years in the digital world. After spending a whole decade as an in-house translator, editor, localization manager and even leading an awesome localization team, she now focuses on Content as a Service and multi-channel publishing. Mentoring, educating and consulting are part of her daily life and passion.

Claudia Befu is a localization expert with 10+ years in the digital world. After spending a whole decade as an in-house translator, editor, localization manager and even leading an awesome localization team, she now focuses on Content as a Service and multi-channel publishing. Mentoring, educating and consulting are part of her daily life and passion.

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(BP18 02) Tatjana Radmilo: Changing the public perception of translation

BP18 Translation Conference Tatjana Radmilo: Changing the public perception of translation

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It is a well-known fact that translators are mostly people who work hidden, in small hours of the night, and are underpaid. Also, the profession of a translator is very often perceived as something that can be done by anybody in their free time, almost as if it were not a real work, …

It is a well-known fact that translators are mostly people who work hidden, in small hours of the night, and are underpaid. Also, the profession of a translator is very often perceived as something that can be done by anybody in their free time, almost as if it were not a real work, but a kind of activity to pass the time and make some extra pocket-money. The only people qualified to change this perception and raise awareness of the wide public are the translators themselves. People believe what they see on TV and read in papers, especially if it is not a paid advertisement, but a real story.

This presentation will be all about examples of best practices by which the visibility of translators and their role can be enhanced, including very concrete examples of collaboration with Croatian Association of Employers, press and TV, local community, NGOs, local and national government, entrepreneurs, social networks, organization of public events to mark International Translators’ Day, etc.

As a result of this kind of campaign, better sensitivity to all language issues was achieved. Also, through communication with the public, translators can develop their social and communication skills and improve their employability and position on labour market.

Tatjana Radmilo is a freelance conference interpreter and translator, columnist and author. She is a member of STIP – Association of Translators and Court Interpreters and a board member of Translators’ Association at Croatian Chamber of Economy. She specializes in legal translation, shipbuilding, sport, marketing, civil sector, but her true love is literary translation.

Tatjana Radmilo is a freelance conference interpreter and translator, columnist and author. She is a member of STIP – Association of Translators and Court Interpreters and a board member of Translators’ Association at Croatian Chamber of Economy. She specializes in legal translation, shipbuilding, sport, marketing, civil sector, but her true love is literary translation.

Tanja’s working languages are Croatian, Russian and English. After teaching English and Russian for 15 years and translating in parallel, she decided to quit her job at a state school and turn to translation. And she never regretted it. During networking with colleagues and working actively in professional associations, the same problem issues would crop up again and again until she decided to do something about it. She has been abundantly rewarded for taking action and now she’s telling you the story about how she did it.

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Walking tours

General information

The walks below are offered by Vienna Walks + Talks.  These are public walks, i.e. these are not exclusive to BP18 attendees.  Simply turn up at the meeting points shown and pay the guide in cash.

Click on the ‘more’ link below each walk to see a more detailed description, the meeting point on the map, as well as the guide’s name and photo. ‘E/D’ means the walk is offered in both English and German.

Payments for previously announced and later cancelled exclusive walking tours will be refunded in cash during the conference.

Tuesday, 17th April 2018, 9:30

The Old City of Vienna between St. Stephen’s and the Hofburg Palace [E/D]

The main sites of the Old City – history and anecdotes

Meeting Point:  corner Kaertnerstraße/Mahlerstraße   [more]

 

Tuesday, 17th April 2018, 13:30

History of Vienna in War and Post-War Times [E/D]

Life of people in war and post-war Vienna

Meeting Point:  Rotenturmstrasse / Schwedenplatz (McDonald’s) [more]

 

Wednesday, 18th April 2018, 13:30

Unknown Underground Vienna [E/D]

Baroque burial crypt, Roman excavations and medieval cellars

Meeting Point:  Michaelerplatz, in front of St. Michael’s Church  [more]

 

Thursday, 19th April 2018, 9:30

Vienna at First Glance [E]

Comprehensive introduction to the most important sights of Vienna’s historical centre

Meeting Point: corner Albertinaplatz/Maysedergasse (Tourist Information)  [more]

 

Thursday, 19th April 2018, 16:15

The Old City of Vienna between St. Stephen’s and Old University [E/D]

Typical Viennese locations and hidden treasures

Meeting Point:  corner Albertinaplatz/Maysedergasse (Touristeninformation)  [more]

 

Friday, 20th April 2018, 9:30

Vienna at First Glance [E]

Comprehensive introduction to the most important sights of Vienna’s historical centre

Meeting Point:  corner Albertinaplatz/Maysedergasse (Tourist Information)  [more]

 

Friday, 20th April 2018, 10:15

Vienna’s „Naschmarkt“: Art, Culture and Savoir Vivre in one of Vienna’s most trendy neighbourhoods [E/D]

Art, Culture and Savoir Vivre in and around Vienna’s Central Market.

Meeting Point:  Friedrichstrasse, in front of Secession   [more]

 

Friday, 20th April 2018, 13:30

Jewish Vienna in Leopoldstadt [E/D]

From Shtetl to Emancipation in Vienna’s 2nd district

Meeting Point:   Corner of Rotenturmstraße / Schwedenplatz (McDonald’s)   [more]

 

Friday, 20th April 2018, 16:00

Vienna in the Footsteps of the Third Man [E/D]

See original locations and hear about the making of the movie

Meeting Point: U4 Station Stadtpark, exit Johannesgasse, in front of station  [more]

 

Friday, 20th April 2018, 16:15

The Old City of Vienna between St. Stephen’s and the Hofburg Palace [E/D]

The main sites of the Old City – history and anecdotes

Meeting Point:   corner Kaertnerstraße/Mahlerstraße   [more]

 

Saturday, 21st April 2018, 9:30

Vienna at First Glance [E]

Comprehensive introduction to the most important sights of Vienna’s historical centre

Meeting Point:   corner Albertinaplatz/Maysedergasse (Tourist Information)  [more]

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Museums

Vienna is a genuine treasure trove for museum and art lovers.   Here’s a full list with great tips.

BP18 museums

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Exhibitions

Vienna is home to several world-class exhibitions, and chances are you’ll be visiting at least one of these.

Temporary exhibitions on the theme 1918-2018

1918 saw not only the end of the Habsburg Empire, but also the death of several famous artists who put Vienna of the map of international art around the turn of the century.

Painters Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Kolo Moser, as well as architect Otto Wagner all died in the same year. Now, in 2018, Vienna has an abundance of exhibitions dedicated to one or more of these artists.   Here’s a full list.

BP18 Klimt

 

650 years of the Austrian National Library

Marvel the founding codex of the library, fully written in gold in 1368, Mozart’s original handwritten score of the Requiem, as well as thousands of scrolls, manuscripts, maps, and photos at the “Treasury of Knowledge” exhibition.

 

And so much more…

Here is a full list of exhibitions and museums in Vienna.

 

 

 

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How do I change the method of payment after placing the order?

It may happen that you realize that the method of payment you selected when placing your order is not convenient for you.   Some people reported this when they first selected bank transfer, but then they realized they’d prefer by a card instead.

If you first selected bank transfer or Transferwise, you can simply ignore the existing order, and place a new one, this time selecting ctedit card / PayPal.

Since your payment comes through immediately when paying with a card, we will see that on our admin page, and we’ll simply delete the unpaid order.

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How can I get the VAT amount refunded?

You can get the VAT amount refunded if you are eligible — basically if you operate as a business rather than an individual.

First of all, make sure you select “business” on the page where you’ll need to fill in your invoicing details. If your business is based in the European Union, you’ll need to provide a valid VAT ID (for example DE12345678).  The validity is checked against the EU’s VIES database.  If you select business and your VAT ID is valid, your VAT ID will be shown on your invoice that you’ll receive in an automated email from our invoicing system.

In taxation terms you’re eligible for a VAT refund if you are a ‘taxable person‘.  Read section 7.3 on pages 15-16 here.   Also read the official info here.   You can apply for a refund through your home country’s tax authority if you’re based in the EU, or by filling in form U5 (in German) by 30 September the following year.  If you’re based outside the EU but you can prove that you operate as a taxable person in your home country, send the above-mentioned U5 form by email or fax or snail mail.

The good news is you can also recover VAT paid in Austria on accommodation and restaurant meals that are related to business events.   Make sure you ask for invoices stating your business name and VAT ID.  See page 320 in this pdf (Deloitte’s guide on VAT refund in individual EU member states).

The minimum amount of VAT to be refunded must be 50€.

Unfortunately you’re not eligible for a VAT return if you purchase your ticket as a private individual – try to make an arrangement with a colleague who is eligible, and buy your tickets together.

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I need help with the shopping/invoicing process

Registering for BP18 is basically purchasing your ticket online by selecting your items below.

Select the desired items

Select the items you wish to purchase, then press the ‘Add to cart’ button under the item.   You may add several items to your shopping cart.

BP18 process 1

When you’re happy with your selection, click on ‘View cart’ next to any of the selected items.

BP18 process 2

Your shopping cart

The next screen is your shopping cart.  At this point you may still go back to add more items or delete any selected items.

You can also apply any discount codes at this stage.  You’ll find a list of frequently used codes at the top of this page.  If you use more than one code, separate them with a comma.

BP18 process 3

Checkout page

The next page is the checkout page.  At the top you still have the option to return to the previous step or add your discount code here.

BP18 process 4

(You’ll find a link to the Privacy Policy here. Sorry, this link is currently broken and it’s not easy to fix. You can access the Privacy Policy from the footer menu.)

Below this you can indicate whether you purchase your ticket as an individual or a business. The default value is ‘individual’.  Select ‘business’ if you want to deduct the invoice amount as a business expense and later apply for a VAT refund from the Austrian tax authority.

In this case a new field appears where you can enter your company name, and you can also specify your  VAT number.  If your business is established in the European Union, please indicate your VAT number without spaces (e.g. DE123456789).   If your business is established outside the European Union you don’t need to provide your tax ID – but be aware that you’re eligible for a tax refund only if you can prove that you’re a ‘taxable person’, i.e.  your company is registered in your home country.

BP18 process 5

At the bottom of this page you can select the method of payment.  Please note that after 7 April the only available methid pf payment is bank card / PayPal, and this carries a 3.9% surcharge.  Don’t forget to check the Terms & Agreements box before proceeding to the payment screen.

BP18 process 6

Payment

If you selected Bank card / PayPal, you’ll be directed to PayPal. Please note that we use PayPal as a credit card processing intermediary.  You’ll be offered to sign up for PayPal, but this is not necessary.  Simply provide your card details as you would any web-based store.

 

BP18 process 7

 

Your invoice

Check your inbox for two automatically generated emails. One is your ‘order receipt’ that lists all the details of your order, including the items purchased and the bank account numbers for wire transfer.  The other email includes a link to your pro forma invoice.

Normally you receive a pro forma invoice only when selecting bank transfer or Transferwise, but now, until 19 April, you receive a pro forma invoice also for credit card payments.  The reason is that it takes a few more days before we receive our Austrian VAT ID.  Once this is obtained, you’ll receive a deposit invoice.

For now, press the orange button at the end of your email.

BP18 processs 8

You can open (and then download) the pdf version of your invoice by clicking on the View button.

BP18 process 9

For each purchase the invoicing system generates three different kinds of documents.

Pro forma invoice: sent automatically as soon as you place your order.  No need to file this to your accountant.

Deposit invoice: this one is sent once the funds appear on our bank account. (For credit card and PayPal payments this will be sent immediately – but only after we receive the Austrian VAT ID, probably before 19 January.).  You can use this for your tax returns.

Final invoice: you’ll receive this after the conference, with the payable amount being zero.

(Hungarian accounting regulations stipulate these three different documents.)

(Disclaimer: the account number prefix shows ‘BP17’. Don’t worry about this, this is just a formality. I set this up last year, and apparently it’s not possible to change this default value in the invoicing system.  Sorry.)

Your attendee profile

As part of the registration process you’ll be able to set up an attendee profile with a photo, a short bio, and some links.  You can also provide your details that you would like to see on your conference badge, and you can also indicated any special diet you may need.

Please see the automated email with the downloadable invoice – this email includes a link to the page where you can set up your profile.  If you attended BP17, you already have one, but you may want to update it.

What next

Your purchase is registered in our database. When in Vienna you simply show up and tell us who you are.

If you register for the welcome dinner on the 18th, you’ll receive your badge at the dinner venue.

In other cases you’ll receive your badge in the cinema Thursday morning (19th).   (If you purchase a Friday-only ticket, you’ll get your badge in the hotel Friday morning (20th)).

Until then, happy translations…

Vienna calling

 

 

 

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Why do I have to pay VAT?

Value Added Tax (VAT) is one the greatest mysteries of modern times.  Even though there’s an EU directive on VAT, each member state has its own set of rules applicable to various situations, with some variations from general principles.

One such variation applicable to events taking place in Austria is that a 20% VAT is payable by all attendees of such events, whether or not they are taxable persons or not.  In practical terms this means that you’ll have to pay the VAT even if you have a valid VAT ID in another member state.   The reverse charge mechanism for VAT payment is not applicable to services such cultural, entertainment, etc. event that can be attended with an admission ticket.   See here (page 19, paragraph 9.1).

The good news is that you’re eligible for a VAT refund if you are a taxable person.  Read section 7.3 on pages 15-16 here.   Also read the official info here.   You can apply for a refund through your home country’s tax authority if you’re based in the EU, or by filling in form U5 (in German) and sending it here by email or fax or snail mail, if you’re based outside the EU but you can prove your status as a taxable person.

Unfortunately you’re not eligible for a VAT return if you purchase your ticket as a private individual – try to make an arrangement with a colleague who is eligible, and buy your tickets together.

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Cancellation policy (+ Terms and Conditions)

Tickets and other items purchased are eligible for a refund. The amount of refund is calculated on the basis of the amount actually paid for the services. A 100% refund (minus 35€ processing fee) is paid if the registration is cancelled before midnight on Monday, 5 March, 2018. A 50% refund (minus 35€ processing fee) is paid if the registration is cancelled before midnight on Monday, 9 April, 2018. No refund is paid after this date.

If you have to cancel your attendance due to an ungranted visa you’ll get a full refund (minus 35€ processing fee) if you cancel your registration before midnight on Monday, 9 April, 2018.

No refund is paid on the ‘BP16+BP17 videos’ item.

Allow up to 7 days to process refunds.

Transferring tickets is allowed with the following conditions:   You may transfer your ticket to BP18 and any of the related events, by informing us about the change and paying a 35€ administration fee.  The two parties involved in the transfer make arrangements about the payment. No new invoice will be issued.

You may also want to read the full text of the Terms and Conditions.

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Is there a volume discount?

Yes. If two or more people purchase tickets on a single invoice, each person gets a 40€ discount from their conference ticket.  Please use the code ‘group40‘.  This discount is valid for any two-day tickets, i.e. both for freelancers and LSPs, with or without dinners.  The only restriction is that the code is valid only if you add at least one dinner per person, i.e. if your minimum spend is 710€.

The ‘friday20‘ discount code gives you 20€ off the Friday-only ticket for freelancers, taking you back to the Early Bird rate, if at least two people buy this item on the same invoice (208€ > 188€) (net prices).

For groups of 5 or more people contact us directly.  (‘Group’ = a single invoice is issued).

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Is there a discount for students and faculty members?

Yes, there is.  Students and faculty members of translation, interpreting, terminology, or related subjects are eligible to a 30% discount from conference tickets.  (Not applicable to dinners.)

The offer is valid for students who are (i) enrolled in the current academic year or were enrolled in the previous academic year (2016/17), and are (ii) below 30, i.e who were born after 19 April 1988.

Send a scanned copy of a certificate of enrollment and your ID card that shows your name and birth date to info@bpconf.com, and you’ll receive your discount code in return.  Allow up to 24 hours.

Faculty members need to send a scanned proof of their status to the same email address.

The number of attendees with student/faculty discount is limited to 10% of all attendees.

 

 

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How long are current prices valid for?

Current prices are valid until 28 February (midnight CET).

Read about the prices valid from 1 March in a separate F.A.Q. item on this page.

Check out another question above about volume discounts.

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What are the current prices?

The current price for a 2-day ticket costs 298€ for freelancers.  Even you have your own company or brandname, but operate as a freelancer, you can buy the ticket at this price.

If at least two people buy their tickets together (on the same invoice), each person gets a 30€ discount: use the coupon code ‘group30’ to get this discount.

The 2-day ticket LSPs and similar companies costs 408€. In exchange they will get a distinctive appearance at the conference with a lanyard of a different colour, so they will stand out from the crowd. The idea is that freelancers and LSPs can make more meaningful contacts with each other.   Choosing this type of ticket is optional.

Look at the web store below to find out in detail about prices.

Current prices are valid only until 28 February!

 

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When does registration start?

Registrations starts at noon (CET) on Saturday, 13 January 2018.

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Will there be a babysitting service?

Maybe. Quite a few people ask me about this, so it’s par excellence a frequently asked question.

There may be a solution after all, as I found a good website to find registered babysitters in Vienna.

In order to find out what exactly you need, please fill in this form.

 

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What makes BP18 unique?

You may have heard some great reviews about past BP conferences. But why is all the hype?

First, BP18 has a unique conference format.   On the first day we have a series of short, TED-like talks, each followed by a short Q&A session. We use a mobile app that members of the audience can use to ask questions during the talk – then our witty master of ceremonies poses the most popular questions to the presenters.    Day two follows a more traditional pattern of longer sessions in three parallel tracks – allowing for a wide variety of professional content to be presented during the two days of the conference.   Our long coffee and lunch breaks also contribute to more meaningful conversations.

Second, BP conferences are known for their unique, easy-going atmosphere that actively encourages and facilitates new encounters, many of which turn out to be fruitful professional cooperations or even long-term friendships.   We also lay heavy emphasis on fringe events – more specifically on our three networking dinners where conference attendees can go beyond the small talk.

Third, each annual event take places in a lively historical setting. Vienna has so much to offer, with its grand palaces, world-class musuems, classy cafés, concert halls, flea markets… the list is endless.

Repeated attendees of BP conferences are the best advocates, persuading more and more colleagues each year to attend.

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Using public transport in Vienna

Vienna has a highly developed and efficient public transportation network, with convenient ticket options.

We’ll provide details information about this well in advance, about 2 months before the conference.

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How do I travel to Vienna?

Vienna is right in the heart of Europe, with direct flights from all corners of the continent, as well as several cities overseas.

Good news is that BP18 has an official airline, Austrian, offering a 15% discount to BP18 attendees – more details here.

If you arrive from Austria or a neighbouring region, you’ll probably use ground transport – more details here.

 

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Where can I stay in Vienna?

Hotel Mariott offers rooms at a discounted rate for BP18 attendees, but even these are around 200€ per night.

There are much cheaper hotels and apartments available, especially around the Westbahnhof / Mariahilf area that are conveniently connected by a direct metro line to BP18 venues.

Read more about hotel options here (within the BP18 website).

 

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Will there be a day trip out of Vienna?

Yes, we’ll have a day trip on Saturday (21 April) to the Wachau region, one  of the most beautiful stretches of the Danube, just an hour west from Vienna.  The trip starts with a visit to the Melk Abbey, and continues with a boat ride downstream to the medieval castle of Dürnstein.    More details here.

Quite a few people are interested in a day trip to Salzburg.  This one is not set up yet, but we’re working on it.  Bear in mind that it takes about 2:20 hours by train to reach the birthplace of Mozart, so it will be a long day trip – but totally doable.  Stay tuned.

Some people showed interest in a train journey on the world’s first mountain railway, the Semmeringbahn, which is an easy day trip from Vienna.   Since this involves just sitting on the train and watching the scenery, there will be no organised tours.  We’ll provide all the necessary info on how to get your tickets well in advance.

(last updated: 13 January, 2018)
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Will there be any walking tours in Vienna?

Most probably yes, although we’re still sourcing the tour operator company.

Most probably there will be a sightseeing tour in the morning and another one in the afternoon of Wednesday, 18 April.  We may also have one or two walking tours on Saturday, 21 April.

(last updated:  9 November 2017)
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How about networking dinners?

We’ll have three (3!) networking dinners, as usual.  These are not covered by the conference ticket, but are highly popular among conference attendees.

On Wednesday, 18 April we’ll have a welcome dinner, or, rather, a reception, taking place at Café Prückel, a short walk from the conference venues.  Most people will get their badges here, and we’ll also start our networking game here.

On Thursday, 19 April we’ll have our main conference dinner at Rathauskeller (City Hall cellar), a few tram stops from the conference venue.

On Friday, 20 April we’ll have our farewell dinner at ‘The Room‘, a hip venue near Hundertwasserhaus.

 

Tickets to these dinners will be available as soon as registration to the actual conference starts.

Vegetarian options are provided by default, and on the registration form you can also specify any special diets (vegan, lactose-free, gluten-free).

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Will I get an invoice for my payment?

Yes.  The invoicing process is fully automated.

If you pay by bank transfer or via TransferWise, you’ll first receive a Pro forma invoice, stating the account number and other banking details you’ll need to initiate the transfer.   Once the amount is safely received on our bank account, you’ll receive your ‘deposit invoice’ that you can already send to your accountant.   Shortly after the conference you’ll receive your final invoice with a zero payable balance.  (The reason for this is that payment precedes the actual service, and the final invoice can only be issued after the service is fully provided.)

If you pay immediately (i.e. by bank card / PayPal), you’ll receive the ‘deposit invoice’ straight away, then the final invoice after the conference as described above.

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I’m new to BP conferences, how will I find people to talk to?

BP translation conferences have a reputation of facilitating meeting new people. In fact, several attendees claimed that they made more professional contacts and made more friends than at several previous conferences combined.

We’ll have a unique, proprietary networking game that forces people to get out of their comfort zones and talk to new people they would not normally contact at a crowded conference.

Join us at BP18, this is an excellent opportunity to meet new people from around the world… and actually stay friends with them.

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Can you issue an invitation letter for a Schengen visa?

First things first: read about the Austrian visa application process. Some additional info here.

Here you will find that when attending a conference, you’ll need four items to submit as part of your visa application, and only one of them is the invitation letter.

If you need an invitation letter, please follow this procedure:

  1. Register for the conference (i.e. you need to pay for the conference ticket)
  2. Complete this form for the invitation letter and send us a message about this.
  3. Apply for the visa at the local Austrian embassy.

Please apply for the visa in time (1 to 3 months before the conference).   Visas are granted by the embassies and consulates of Austria, and we do not assume responsibility for their decisions.   In case your visa is rejected, you’ll get a full refund of the amount you paid for registering for BP18 (minus a small handling fee).

(last updated: 13 January 2018)
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Who can attend BP18?

Anyone can attend BP18; there’s no eligibility criteria as such.   Most of the attendees are usually freelance translators with 5-20 years of experience, and we also have a fair share of freelance interpreters.  There’s also increasing number of representatives of LSP’s, translation agencies, CAT tool makers, national translators’ associations, etc.

About 90% of the attendees come from various European countries, with an increasing number of people flying in from other continents.

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Is there a discount for students and faculty?

Yes, most probably there will be a 33% discount for students and faculty members of translation/interpreting/terminology or related studies.

Once registration starts, please send a scanned copy of your ID card, as well as a document that proves that you’re enrolled as a student in the current academic year, or that you’re a teacher/professor of translation studies or at a related field.

Please note that the student discount is available only for people who were born after April 19, 1988.  Also, the total number of tickets available as part of this offer is 20.

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How can I register for BP18?

You can register for the conference by purchasing your conference ticket.   Tickets will be available some time in December, or, at the latest, in early January.   You can sign up to be notified by e-mail if you don’t want to miss it.

Once registration starts, you can register for BP18 by purchasing your conference ticket and any additional items in our web store.

The registration and invoicing process is automated.  You’ll need to provide your billing details, then select your preferred method of payment, then check out to pay.

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I’m interested in the ATA exam

Time

The exam will take place on Wednesday, 18 April, between 13:30 and 16:30. Candidates must arrive by 13:00 to allow time for checking IDs and distributing exam papers.

It will be a computerized exam, so bring your own laptop.  Sufficient number of power outlets will be available.

Location

The exam will take place in room C204+ at WIFI Wien. The address is Währinger Gürtel 97, Wien 1080.

The easiest way to reach the venue is by subway U6, getting off at Währingerstrasse / Volksoper.

There are also trams (40, 41, 42) from Schottentor (which is a subway stop at the northern edge of the historical centre).

BP18 Translation Conference ATA exam venue

Once you’re at the building, this is the way to the exam room.  ‘C’ is the third building from the subway stop, and room 204 is on the second floor.

BP18 Translation Conference ATA exam location WIFI Wien

Eligibility / registration

IMPORTANT:  Read about the exam over at ATA’s website.  Make sure you meet the eligibility criteria in advance and you apply for the exam directly with ATA in time.

You cannot turn up at the exam venue without registering for the exam with ATA in advance.

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How much does the conference cost?

There are many factor to keep in mind when calculating the price of conference ticket. The single largest expense item is the rental price of the venues and equipment, while the most significant variable item is the cost of catering.

If all goes well, early bird prices will be announced early December.

Tickets will be released in blocks. For example the first batch of 70 tickets will cost X €, the second batch of 70 tickets will cost X+30 €, and so on.

If you wish to be notified when tickets will be available, sign up here.

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Do I need to pay VAT?

It depends.

If you are based in the European Union and have an EU-level VAT number, you don’t need to pay VAT.  In this case please specify on the billing details page that you wish to pay as a company, then provide your VAT number without a space (e.g. ‘DE123456789’).  As part of the registration process the validity of this VAT number will be checked against the VIES database.

It has happened in the past that this connection to this database is temporarily unavailable – in this case please try it again a minute later.

If you are based in the European Union but do not have a VAT number or if you only have a national VAT number, you’ll need to pay VAT. And that’s a 27% Hungarian VAT (the highest in the EU – sorry, it’s not my fault).   The company that organizes BP18 is registered in Budapest, Hungary. Unlike in previous years, this time we didn’t registered for a local VAT number, so essentially the service (the conference itself) is provided by a company that’s registered in a different EU member state.

To avoid paying this VAT, the best you can do is team up with a colleague who has an eligible EU VAT number, then find an arrangement with them.

If you’re based in Hungary, you’ll have to pay 27% VAT, then claim back the VAT amount at the end of the quarter.

If you’re based outside the European Union, there’s no way to check if your business is eligible for VAT exemption or not.  If you select you pay as a company and you enter a business-looking billing name, you should be fine.   At past events, for example, several attendees from Ukraine entered their names, together with the abbreviation that stands for ‘individual entrepreneur’.

 

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F. A. Q. test

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